Month: June 2021

Chill-out chat with Jamie Heaslip

first_imgWould you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 Jay-Z and Kanye West perform during the 2011 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show at the Lexington Avenue Armory on November 9, 2011 in New York City. The show will be broadcast on November 29, 2011. AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images) JH: I’m really impulsive when it comes to internet shopping. My vice is Apple gadgets – iPhone, iPad – but I haven’t got anything too bad. When it comes to fancy-dress costumes, I always buy on-line from the UK because all the boys use Irish sites.RW: Who’s had the best costume for a fancy-dress party? JH: Fergus McFadden and Fionn Carr came as Venus and Serena Williams – head to toe in black paint, the right branded clothes and necklaces. It was an unbelievable effort. Myself, Cian and Eoin O’Malley organise the Leinster parties and we might start giving prizes. We should definitely give one to the worst.RW: What couldn’t you live without? JH: My dog and my iPhone. I feel naked without it. I think one of my mates would post a prank on Facebook if I left it on the table, so I’ve got to have it with me.RW: Any regrets? JH: I used to but not now. There’s nothing you can do about them; they’re what make you.RW: What are your top three gigs? JH: Mumford & Sons at Oxegen in 2010 were unbelievable. Adele in the Olympia Theatre in Dublin. Then it’s between Swedish House Mafia at Pacha last year in Ibiza; Jay-Z at Oxegen in 2010 because he blew the place wide open even though Arcade Fire were headlining; and The Game at the Olympia.RW: What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? JH: To be somewhat successful in business and balance that with a happy family. I’ve got a massive interest in on-line marketing – but hopefully I won’t have to retire for a few years yet.RW: How would you like to be remembered? JH: As a good, honest player.This article appeared in the April 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Jamie Heaslip watches the ball sail through the posts for a France penalty (04/03/12)RUGBY WORLD: Do you have any phobias? Jamie Heaslip: I hate snakes. Once on holiday, a guy had a snake around his neck and tried to put it on me. I had to tell him to go away. I also hate small creatures that can kill you, like the (funnel-web) spider that can kill you with one little bite.RW: Any bugbears? JH: Bad manners, especially when eating. I despise dishonest people. And people who want to be known for nothing – Big Brother is everything that’s wrong with the world.RW: If your house was on fire, what three things would you save? JH: Just my dog. He’s home alone right now.RW: Is it safe to leave him home alone?! Heaslip named his bulldog after US rapper Jay-ZJH: He got through a couple of pairs of Pumas and a nice pair of Paul Smith shoes when I first got him, but he’s good now.RW: What superpower would you like to have? JH: I’d like to be Wolverine from X-Men because you can’t die. You could shoot me but I’d never die.RW: Who’s your ideal woman? JH: No one can hold a candle to my mum. Christine Heaslip is a saint – she’s the only woman for me!RW: What’s your dream holiday? JH: I’ve got a pretty good holiday lined up this year. I’m going to Haiti with GOAL to see the work the charity are doing. Then I’m meeting some of the boys in New York before going to Vegas for 4 July. Then we’re driving to LA.RW: Who’d you like to be stuck in a lift with? JH: Michael McIntyre, Lil Wayne, Jay-Z, Drake. Who else? Tom Hardy. He seems like a good bloke. I saw his film Warrior recently and thought it was good.RW: What’s your idea of a perfect night out? JH: It would start with drinks at mine and then we’d go to different pubs on South William Street. Grogan’s does a great pint of Guinness.RW: Who are the best and worst room-mates? JH: Cian Healy. He’s a great guy to room with and I hang out with him a lot away from rugby. But he snores so loud. If he gets to sleep before me it means I can’t sleep.RW: What’s the silliest thing you’ve bought? Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad.last_img read more


June 23, 2021 0

Autumn Internationals: Talking points from week two

first_img Wales 13-6 GeorgiaWales started brightly, making bursts in midfield, fizzing the ball wide and with Rhys Priestland pulling the strings at ten, so when Hallam Amos crossed in the 19th minute it looked promising for the hosts. But then, as Dan Lydiate described it, “we got dragged into an arm wrestle” and it looked like Georgia might level the scores in the final minutes when they won a penalty and Tomas Francis was sin-binned. With starting tighthead Leon Brown injured, though, it went to uncontested scrums, the visitors opted for a five-metre lineout and, after several phases, conceded a penalty that brought an end to the game.The end of the game was farcical. The confusion caused around the move to uncontested scrums went on for several minutes and the crowd grew restless. Eyebrows were certainly raised over the decision given that Leon Brown was seen on the touchline appearing to warm up. Yet Warren Gatland said Brown was suffering cramp when he came off, even though it wasn’t why he was substituted, and that the cramp had got more severe while he was on the sidelines. “I can promise you there wasn’t anything from our point of view in terms of trying to manipulate the laws,” said the Wales coach.A single highlight: Hallam Amos of Wales( far right) celebrates his scoreMilton Haig, the Georgia coach, was confident his team would have scored had a contested five-metre scrum in the closing minutes gone ahead given that Wales were a man down and said: “We would have backed ourselves for sure.” After all, ten minutes earlier they had a series of scrums five metres out from the Wales posts and looked close to being awarded a penalty try, before Wales won the penalty at the fourth scrum.The whole series of events raised several questions. Aside from the uncontested scrums, Georgia changed their decision as to what they wanted to do from that final penalty after the referee had signaled for a scrum, which is another issue altogether. World Rugby said: “All matches are reviewed, including match official, performance reviewer and coach feedback. It would be inappropriate to comment until the facts have been obtained and the review has been undertaken.”FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREMoving on from the controversy at the end, this was not a good game of rugby, yet Georgia showed how good a side they are. It’s not just their physicality up front that stood out; they were organised in defence and had a decent kicking game too. As Haig said, they will have benefited from this experience of playing a Tier One team.As for Wales, there were glimpses early on of what they were trying to do, but their penchant for throwing miss-passes wasn’t always effective as the slow movement of the ball allowed Georgia’s defence to move across and tackle the receiver.Happy chappy: Danny Care of England scores a a try to punish AustraliaEngland 30-6 Australia So close: Stuart Hogg very nearly sparked a winner against the All Blacks Scotland came so close to achieving history. With the last play of the game Stuart Hogg, the eventual man of the match who worried defenders every time he touched the ball, sliced through and looked for the outside edge. With Beauden Barrett zeroing in on Hogg, play moved ever closer to the Kiwi line. As Barrett just managed to reel in Hogg he looked to pass inside with one hand to the crowd pushing forward. But it was forward and the game ended, so tantalisingly close to a first-ever win for the hosts.This match had an incredible atmosphere. So often light displays, noise and videos can be confusing, distracting and ill-judged. However, this was pitched just right, and with Doddie Weir coming out with his family to present the match ball after the haka, there was a sense of something special.The game also helped. It swayed from end to end, fizzing with all the energy of a proper Test. Scotland carried well and built phases, with Huw Jones and John Barclay shining throughout. Finn Russell and Ali Price shifted play and kicked smartly, while Hogg got the crowd on his feet.New Zealand were by far the better scrum throughout. In the changing rooms after the match, assistant coach Mike Cron heaped praise in his pack, with a seven-man shove repelling the Scots so near their own line. The savage, cutting edge was also there for the All Blacks. Their three tries were clean and sharp, but Barrett’s try was one to remember – from a scrum, Sonny Bill Williams got it on the front foot. He offloaded out the back door to a motoring Damian McKenzie, who made a simple pass to the fly-half for the try.Scotland’s game was all the more impressive as they suffered so many injuries in this game. In the first half Hamish Watson went off with a bad back. Luke Hamilton did well in his first cap, but then suffered an ankle injury. Hooker Stuart McInally moved into the back-row with Georg Turner coming on, but there were more problems. At half-time Zander Fagerson was replaced by Simon Berghan and early in the second, Alex Dunbar went off for Pete Horne.Moment of brilliance: Beauden Barrett finishes a breathtaking moveThe All Blacks discipline was lacking. Waisake Naholo benefitted from leniency from the officials when a yellow card for tackling Hogg in the air was downgraded to just a penalty as Price initially stood in his way. But they received two yellows – one for Sam Cane and one for Wyatt Crockett – for murdering Scottish ball near the line. If they hadn’t done it, Scotland could have manufactured more than one burrow-over score like Jonny Gray’s, but they did what they could to cling on.After this one some were wondering if the close nature of this game had a greater significance. Asked about that, All Blacks coach Steve Hansen said: “Rugby’s in a good place. Everyone back home was telling us that they were getting bored of us being dominant. Well, they’ll just have to go away and have a cup of tea and think about that.”Back to form: Cian Healy was one of a few standouts against FijiIreland 23-20 New ZealandIreland had to squeak by in this contest where Fiji were full of ambition but the hosts never clicked. They threw away a 17-3 lead, with the Fijians drawing level at the start of the second half.With 13 changes to the Ireland team that defeated South Africa the week before, it is no surprise that things didn’t click. It did not help that young Joey Carberry went off in the second with a suspected arm fracture, but while Darren Sweetnam shone on one wing, but the centres looked understandably like strangers and the pack were caught out at the ruck time and again.Ian Keatley was eventually the man to ensure Irish victory, doing the business from the tee with two crucial penalty kicks.The return to form of Cian Healy is at least one shining light.Leone Nakarawa and Nemani Nadolo combined to create a fine try for Henry Senilolo – these players and Ben Volavola need to be acknowledged for their fine play. Nakarawa in particular must be in discussions whenever current world bests are discussed. This was a game with so many marginal calls to be made by the officials – with 28-year-old referee Ben O’Keefe at the centre of it all – and Australia continually fell on the wrong side of the decisions. The most notable call were to chalk off a Marika Koroibete score due to a perceived obstruction by replacement hooker Stephen Moore as Chris Robshaw tried to tackle and then hold up the ball. Elliot Daly also scored a try where the kick ahead tickled the touchline but was judged to have remained in after several replays. Considering there were two yellow cards (one for Michael Hooper and one for Kurtley Beale) and Hooper also had a try disallowed just after the opening quarter because Hooper was ahead of play, you can understand why head coach Michael Cheika was less than thrilled with what was happening on the field.The score-line looks flattering for England, but the English ran away with it in the closing stages of the match. With Australia looking like they wouldn’t get the rub of the green, England’s backs must get credit for their ruthlessness. If Daly’s try was fortuitous, Jonathan Joseph’s score from a Danny Care box kick looked smart and Jonny May’s score from a sneaky Care grubber looked confident. When the replacement scrum-half finished off a move for England’s fourth try, after May collected his own chip, it all looked so impressively clinical from England.On the hoof: Jonny May breaks clearOwen Farrell has been credited with talking round referee O’Keefe as the TMO was showing replays of Koroibete’s grounding. The fly-half was heard asking about Moore’s line, and despite frame after frame of new angles on the grounding, O’Keefe finally made the call of obstruction. Mind you, several Australian spectators were left questioning whether Robshaw had actually been offside a few phases before anyway.England’s locks were incredible. Joe Launchbury buzzed with activity and Courtney Lawes was a punishing force. With Maro Itoje an early substitution for Sam Underhill, seeing him charge around only highlighted the frightening competition for places in the English boiler house.Almost there: The Scotland players realise they won’t win at the endScotland 17-22 New Zealand Scotland almost pulled off a miraculous win over New Zealand, England capitalised on their luck against Australia while Wales and Ireland just inched to wins – we look at the big talking points from the second week of autumn Internationals TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more


June 23, 2021 0

Summer Tours: Argentina v Wales Preview for Match One

first_img Putting his hands up: Cory Hill will captain Wales for the first time on Saturday in Argentina (Getty Images) All you need to know about the Test between Argentina and Wales in San Juan Argentina v Wales PreviewCory Hill will captain Wales for the first time when he leads the team out in San Juan for the first of two Tests against Argentina.Warren Gatland has selected an inexperienced pack to go up against the renowned Pumas scrum, with only three players who have reached double figures for caps – Hill has played 16 times for his country, Ross Moriarty 21 times and Rob Evans, who has come into the starting line-up following a training injury to Wyn Jones, 25 times.In contrast, Argentina captain Agustin Creevy has only ten fewer caps than the entire Welsh pack combined, with 71, while the young but experienced duo of Tomas Lavanini and Guido Petti are reunited in the second row. So this match is likely to be a big test for the Wales set-piece.Leading figure: Pumas captain and hooker Agustin Creevy (Getty Images)Wales will be looking for their fourth straight Test win having beaten South Africa in Washington last weekend while Argentina’s players will be feeling confident given that the Jaguares have been performing well in Super Rugby.Here’s what you need to know about the match…What’s the big team news?Warren Gatland has made eight personnel changes and one positional change to his starting XV. George North moves back to the wing from centre while Rhys Patchell and Gareth Davies come in at half-back and Hadleigh Parkes and Scott Williams start in midfield.Related: Downtime with Rhys PatchellJosh Adams, called up to replace the injured Steff Evans, will win his third cap on the wing while James Davies is picked at openside for what will be his second Test appearance.Jump to it: Josh Adams will start on the wing against Argentina (Getty Images)The other changes in the pack see Adam Beard start in the second row in place of Bradley Davies and Rob Evans get the No 1 shirt. Wyn Jones was originally due to start at loosehead but has since been ruled out of the tour after picking up a calf injury in training.Aaron Wainwright could make his debut from the bench having been an unused replacement against South Africa last week.Bautista Delguy, 21, will make his Argentina debut in a team that sees six changes from the one that faced Ireland last November.In the pack, Guido Petti comes in at lock and Javier Ortega Desio at No 8. There is a different midfield combination in Jeronimo de la Fuente and Matias Orlando while Gonzalo Bertranou starts ahead of the experienced Martin Landajo at scrum-half.Emiliano Boffelli, who features in the current issue of Rugby World magazine, also makes only his second Test start at full-back having spent the majority of his international career on the wing. What have the coaches said?Argentina coach Daniel Hourcade: “We must maintain the base of Jaguares, to take advantage of all the good that it is being done. Wales are not going to study us based on what we played in November but in Super Rugby.“Then we must have variants to be able to generate some type of surprise, considering also the game style.”Danger man: Bautista Delguy in action for the Jaguares in Super Rugby (Getty Images)Wales head coach Warren Gatland: “We know we have got two big Tests ahead of us against Argentina. They are a side that come together full of confidence and it is important we take our opportunities.“There is a lot of exciting youth in this squad and Saturday is a chance for them to continue building their experience on the Test scene and to put a marker down.”Any interesting statistics?Wales’ only series win in Argentina came in 1999, when they won 36-26 and 23-16, and they haven’t won a Test in the country since 2004 as they lost both Tests in the 2006 series.Jaguares wing Bautista Delguy is the joint fifth top try-scorer in Super Rugby this season with eight tries.Wales’ three Test wins in Argentina have all come in Buenos Aires but this year’s two matches are being played in San Juan and Santa Fe.Argentina have won only three of their last 20 Tests and those victories came against Japan in 2016 and Georgia and Italy in 2017.George North has more Wales caps (74) than five other players in the starting back-line – Hallam Amos (16), Josh Adams (2), Hadleigh Parkes (7), Rhys Patchell (8) and Gareth Davies (32) – combined.Flashback: Dafydd James in action during Wales’ 1999 series win in Argentina (Getty Images)When does it kick off and is it on TV?The match is being played at in San Juan in the west of Argentina, close to the Andes, and the Estadio San Juan del Bicentenario has a capacity of more than 25,000. It kicks off at 8.40pm UK time on Saturday night and you can watch the game live on Channel 4.Andrew Brace, who lives in Ireland but was born in Cardiff, is the referee for this fixture. South African Jaco Peyper and Mathieu Raynal, of France, are his assistants and the same trio will also be in charge of next week’s second Test, with Peyper taking the whistle.Wise winger: George North is the most experienced player in the Wales team (Getty Images)What are the line-ups?ARGENTINA: Emiliano Boffelli; Bautista Delguy, Matias Orlando, Jeronimo de la Fuente, Ramiro Moyano; Nicolas Sanchez, Gonzalo Bertranou; Santiago Garcia Botta, Agustin Creevy (captain), Nahuel Tetaz Chaparro, Guido Petti, Tomas Lavanini, Pablo Matera, Marcos Kremer, Javier Ortega Desio.Replacements: Julian Montoya, Javier Diaz, Santiago Medrano, Matias Alemanno, Tomas Lezana, Martin Landajo, Santiago Gonzalez Iglesias, Sebastian Cancelliere.WALES: Hallam Amos; Josh Adams, Scott Williams, Hadleigh Parkes, George North; Rhys Patchell, Gareth Davies; Rob Evans, Elliot Dee, Dillon Lewis, Adam Beard, Cory Hill (captain), Seb Davies, James Davies, Ross Moriarty.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Replacements: Ryan Elias, Nicky Smith, Tomas Francis, Josh Turnbull, Aaron Wainwright, Aled Davies, Gareth Anscombe, Owen Watkin.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more


June 23, 2021 0

Communiqué: Anglican-Lutheran International Co-ordinating Committee

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Sep 27, 2013 Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Communiqué: Anglican-Lutheran International Co-ordinating Committee Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC [Anglican Communion News Service]Anglican-Lutheran International Co-ordinating CommitteeHelsinki, Finland19–25 September 2013CommuniquéThe Anglican-Lutheran International Co-ordinating Committee (ALICC) held its first meeting in the Cultural Centre Sofia, Helsinki, Finland from 19 to 25 September 2013, under the leadership of the Most Reverend Maurício Andrade, Primate of Brazil, and of Bishop Michael Pryse of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada.The meeting was hosted by the Lutheran World Federation with the generous assistance of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland.The Co-ordinating Committee studied the mandate given by the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) and the Anglican Communion. The focus of this work is to monitor and encourage existing Anglican-Lutheran relations, as well as to advance co-operation between the two Churches in areas where there are not yet any formal agreements. To enable the Committee to function as an encourager as well as a catalyst, the Committee has begun a process of mapping agreements, initiatives and projects in different regions. This mapping project is an ongoing task for the Committee and we urge Churches, in both communions, to provide information to further this task.The Committee has also initiated a process promoting Anglican-Lutheran collaboration in the observance of the 2017 Reformation anniversary. As part of this the Committee intends to provide study material based around the official LWF theme Liberated by God’s Grace. This material would be designed to be used in joint Anglican-Lutheran study groups where both denominations are present as well as by separated groups. It is hoped that this material will relate to different ages and contexts. The purpose is to highlight that reformation is ongoing and that 16th century Reformation thoughts are relevant for Christians today. The Committee is locating this and all its work within the theological theme of communion in the mission of God.The Diocese of Tampere and Bishop Matti Repo invited the Co-ordinating Committee to the Diocese on Sunday 22 September for worship and for sharing local Lutheran-Anglican initiatives. The Bishop and some of his clerical colleagues shared experiences of working together with their Anglican partner Diocese of Manchester (Church of England). The two dioceses have developed close co-operation in preparing youngsters for confirmation and in exploring urban theology. The Diocese of Tampere hosts an English-speaking international congregation in one of their churches and provides clergy to assist the Anglican Chaplaincy in Helsinki which oversees this ministry. The Committee is appreciative of the hospitality shown by Bishop Matti Repo and his wife, the Revd Päivi Repo, who provided fellowship and an excellent lunch.Metropolitan Ambrosius, Orthodox Bishop of Helsinki, invited the Committee to his home, offering hospitality describing the current situation for the Orthodox Church in Finland and the work of the Sofia Centre.Present at the first meeting of ALICC were:Anglicans:The Most Revd Maurício Andrade, Brazil (Co-Chair)The Revd Dalcy Dlamini, Swaziland, Southern AfricaThe Rt Revd Dr Tim Harris, AustraliaThe Revd Augusta Leung, Hong KongThe Revd Canon John Lindsay, ScotlandThe Revd Canon Dr Alyson Barnett-Cowan, Anglican Communion Office (Co-Secretary)Lutherans:Bishop Michael Pryse, Canada (Co-Chair)Rev. Ángel Furlan, ArgentinaRev. Joyceline Fred Njama, TanzaniaRev. Canon Helene Tärneberg Steed, Sweden and IrelandRev. Anne Burghardt, Lutheran World Federation (Co-Secretary)ApologyBishop Philip Lok, Malaysia Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Ecumenical & Interreligious Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion, Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Ferguson, Misurí: líderes de la Iglesia intentan ayudar a rehacer…

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Por Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 18, 2014 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cicatrices permanentes, divisiones raciales y económicasMientras viajaba hasta Ferguson desde la iglesia catedral de Cristo [Christ Church Cathedral] en San Luis, para participar en la marcha del 14 de agosto, contaba Smith: “pasé por el cementerio del Calvario, donde está enterrado Dred Scott, y pensaba en esa larga y dolorosa historia que hemos tenido con las relaciones raciales aquí en la ciudad y el condado de San Luis”.Dread Scott, siendo esclavo, presentó una demanda para obtener su libertad en un caso célebre que finalmente llegó al Tribunal Supremo de EE.UU. En 1857, el tribunal dictaminó que por ser Scott negro, no era ciudadano y, por consiguiente, no tenía derecho a demandar.Smith dijo que se había unido a la marcha atendiendo la invitación de la Coalición de Clérigos Metropolitanos “una organización predominantemente afroamericana. Enviamos una notificación por correo electrónico al clero y al laicado y en verdad me sentí animado por la decidida muestra de apoyo”.“espero que nuestra Iglesia pueda seguir el ejemplo de lo que la comunidad de Ferguson y las comunidades vecinas necesitan y quieren. Tenemos que respetar su integridad y su autoridad”, afirmó.Smith dijo también que durante la marcha “desfiló con un joven del Colegio Universitario de Morehouse que había venido en auto desde Atlanta con Ruby Sales”, quien había sido invitada a hablar en un evento local.“Él quería contribuir con la resolución del conflicto en San Luis y me pidió mis señas para ponerse en contacto conmigo”, contó Smith. “Le mencioné que ayer era la fiesta de Jonathan Daniels”, el seminarista episcopal que murió por salvar a Sales de un escopetazo durante la campaña en pro de los derechos civiles en 1965, [que se llamó] Verano de la Libertad en Hayneville, Alabama. ‘Una enorme falta de confianza’El Muy Rdo. Mike Kinman, deán de la iglesia catedral de Cristo en San Luis, dijo que después que se diera a conocer, el 15 de agosto, el nombre del agente así como la información que incriminaba a Brown como sospechoso de robo, “la situación estaba cambiando por instantes”.El momento de comunicar esa información “denuncia la enorme falta de confianza en nuestra comunidad; que es uno de los problemas fundamentales aquí”, señaló. “Ha habido, a lo largo del tiempo, un increíble deterioro de la confianza entre la comunidad negra de San Luis y el departamento de la policía y las instituciones de la justicia en general, y no sólo en Ferguson, sino en toda el área metropolitana”.El 14 de agosto, el gobernador de Misurí, Jay Nixon, le quitó la supervisión de la seguridad en Ferguson a la policía local y la puso en manos del capitán Ronald S. Johnson, de Patrulla de Caminos, y prometió un cambio en el tono de lo que el Rdo. Steve Lawler y otros han llamado “una militarización” de la policía.La policía estatal se unió con los manifestantes en la marcha del 14 de agosto. Brillaban por su ausencia los equipos antimotines, las armas semiautomáticas, los vehículos blindados y la excesiva demostración de fuerza que antes había usado la policía de Ferguson, apuntó él.“Esa ha sido la gran conmoción, la mayor sorpresa, la respuesta de la policía”, dijo Lawler, rector de la iglesia episcopal de San Esteban [St. Stephen’s] (http://www.saint-stephens.info) en Ferguson. “Realmente ha sido intensa, y parece como si hubiera acelerado, más bien que desacelerado, el resolver la manera en que la gente volviera a trabajar junta”.Chester Hines, presidente de la comisión diocesana sobre el desmantelamiento del racismo estaba dirigiendo un taller de formación antirracista en Sikeston, a 233 kilómetros a sur de San Luis, que ya estaba programado “antes de que Ferguson explotara”.Pero él no se mostró sorprendido por los disparos ni por la violencia, “como un resultado de mi propia experiencia con el racismo en esta comunidad durante más de 60 años ahora”, dijo. “La razón por la cual realizo esta labor se debe a mis propias experiencias personales de convivir con el racismo en San Luis”.Y, agregó, que las mismas circunstancias de Ferguson están presentes en otras comunidades. La diferencia consiste en que “Ferguson tiene una población bastante grande de personas de color, que fueron capaces de salirle al paso como comunidad a las fuerzas del departamento de policía. En la mayoría de nuestras comunidades suburbanas las personas de color son realmente una minoría, de manera que en verdad tienen una voz o un impacto muy limitado”. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Wayne Smith, obispo [episcopal] de Misurí desfila el 14 de agosto, junto con clérigos y otras personas, a través del complejo de apartamentos de Canfield Green, donde el joven Michael Brown, de 18 años, fue muerto a tiros el 9 de agosto. Foto de Mike Angell.[Episcopal News Service] La Rda. Teresa Mithen-Danieley confiando en que “probablemente no habría gases lacrimógenos” se llevó consigo a su hija de dos años, Ruby Frances, a la marcha del 14 de agosto en Ferguson, Misurí, para empezar a rehacer la confianza de la comunidad después de que un policía matara a tiros a un adolescente negro desarmado el 9 de agosto y la secuela de violencia que ello tuvo.Junto con el obispo Wayne Smith, de Misurí, ella y otros episcopales se unieron al menos a otras 1.000 personas —clérigos, funcionarios públicos, vecinos y partidarios— en una manifestación en Ferguson de más de 3 kilómetros de largo, en la cual los clérigos se situaron en los perímetros y en los extremos, según dijo Mithen-Danieley.“Quisimos tratar de hacerle claro a cualquiera que quisiera participar en la manifestación y a la policía y al público que este es un acto no violento, y que estábamos todos allí en solidaridad con las personas de Ferguson”.Mientras los manifestantes se acercaban al complejo de Canfield Green, donde el adolescente de 18 años Michael Brown resultó fatalmente herido el 9 de agosto “entrábamos en un valle de casas estilo rancho y uno podía ver que todo el barrio estaba saturado de gases lacrimógenos”, explicó.“Uno podía apreciar en la medida en que usaron los gases lacrimógenos, permeaban toda la zona”, dijo Mithen-Daniely, rectora de la iglesia episcopal de San Juan [St. John’s Episcopal Church] en Tower Grove cerca de San Luis.La agresión a tiros —y el nivel de la violencia policial dirigida a la comunidad predominantemente afroamericana en los días que siguieron— ha reabierto viejas heridas y expuesto dolorosamente las divisiones raciales y económicas en esta comunidad suburbana de San Luis de unos 21.000 habitantes.Y el 15 de agosto, la declaración de la policía en que nombraba al agente que hizo los disparos e identificab a Michael Brown como sospechoso de un robo no cambió nada de eso, según el obispo Smith.“La elección del momento es desafortunada, que la mención de Michael Brown como sospechoso se haya dado a conocer al mismo momento en que se revelaba el nombre del agente”, dijo él a ENS el 15 de agosto. “Simplemente no pareció justo. Es absolutamente una maniobra distractiva en lo concerniente a la agresión policial en sí”.Los efectos persistentes de la violencia espiritual de la justicia racial y económica “no son nuevos para nosotros; es algo que hemos tenido que enfrentar durante mucho tiempo”, añadió Smith quien, en un comunicado en la página web de la diócesis, hizo un llamado a todos los episcopales “especialmente a aquellos cuya raza o cultura les otorga un innato privilegio, lo que se ha puesto de manifiesto, a orar acerca de estas cosas, a aprender humildemente de ellas, y anhelar y laborar en pro de respuestas que promuevan la justicia”. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Racial Justice & Reconciliation Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ferguson, Submit an Event Listing Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comenzar la ardua tarea de la reconciliaciónCongregarse y avanzar constituye un reto a largo plazo, dijo Angell. “Es un problema de racismo sistémico”, afirmó. “Tenemos una crisis en nuestro país que salió a relucir con lo que sucedió con Michael Brown. Es permanente. Tenemos mucho que hacer hoy día y ¿no es la Iglesia exactamente el lugar donde debemos hacerlo?”.La Rda. Teresa Mithen-Danieley convino con él.“Ha habido alguna respuesta inmediata esta semana, y me alegro de eso”, dijo Mithen-Danieley, que creció en Normandy, una comunidad vecina a Ferguson. “Pero quiero un compromiso a largo plazo”, añadió.“Para mí, eso no significa mucho, a menos que la diócesis como un todo y las personas de la diócesis continúen invirtiendo y participando en la justicia económica y la justicia racial a largo plazo en nuestra región. Desafortunadamente, esta tragedia ha ayudado a las personas a ver que hay muchísimas tensiones que han estado ocurriendo a lo largo de toda mi vida, y yo tengo 37”, puntualizó ella.“Espero que sea una oportunidad de llevar esto a toda la Iglesia, cómo la justicia racial y la económica están vinculadas y que esto es un problema a largo plazo que no se va a acabar cuando se acaben las manifestaciones”.Kinman se mostró de acuerdo.“Ahora mismo, está en los medios de prensa, una causa que nos ha exaltado, y eso es importante y está bien. Pero los asuntos con que esto tiene que ver son el poder y el privilegio y la raza y la clase social y ellos han estado presente durante mucho tiempo. Enfrentarse a esto conllevará un empeño sostenido.“Y les corresponderá a las personas con poder y privilegios, y esas constituyen la mayoría de los episcopales blancos y de los sanluiseños blancos; y nos corresponderá educarnos y convertirnos realmente en buenos escuchas y examinar cómo somos llamados a cambiar algunos de estos sistemas que llevaron a la muerte de Michael Brown”.La catedral está sosteniendo conversaciones respecto a formar parte de ese proceso actual educativo “y de restauración, no de restauración hasta el punto donde todo el mundo, de alguna manera, se quede callado otra vez, sino restauración que nos lleve a alcanzar un nivel diferente”, explicó.“Nunca le devolveremos la vida a Michael Brown, pero esto puede redimirse de algún modo”.“No resulta fácil, en momentos como éste, elegir a una parte —a una persona o a un grupo de personas— como completamente buena y a la otra parte como completamente mala, y tenemos que resistir eso a toda costa. Pero, somos llamados a ser embajadores de Cristo y ministros de la reconciliación y tenemos que respaldar a todo el mundo. Tenemos que llamar a todos nosotros a ser esas imágenes de Dios que son nuestra mejor naturaleza.“Esa es la labor a largo plazo de la Iglesia, establecer relaciones de amor y de respeto con todos, de manera que podamos congregarlos a todos y decir escuchémoslos a todos y atendamos lo que Dios nos está llamando a ser”.–La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Emplear ‘el poder del Evangelio’No obstante, a pesar de todo, dijo Lawler, “el poder del Evangelio ha sido palpable”.La despensa de San Esteban está desesperadamente necesitada de reabastecimientos; muchos negocios locales estuvieron cerrados y los vecinos se mostraban renuentes a aventurarse afuera debido a la masiva presencia de la policía, contó él.“No podíamos conseguir alimentos y sabíamos que esta es la época del año cuando la gente tiene que comprar útiles escolares y otras cosas”, dijo. “El lunes habría sido el primer día de clases del distrito escolar.“Las personas ya estaban presionadas económicamente”, añadió. “Es un mes caro”.Pero la respuesta resultó abrumadora, ya que las congregaciones diocesanas, las organizaciones comunitarias y los individuos inundaron la despensa con alimentos y artículos de uso personal. Por ejemplo, dijo Lawler, “hay un hombre que está por temporadas sin hogar, pero pasó y me dio un par de latas de frijoles listos para comer, las cuales yo sé que son probablemente la mitad de la comida que él tiene para el día, si acaso”.“Otro tipo, cuyo hijo se encontraba comprando marihuana en el lugar equivocado a la hora equivocada, y a quien mataron a tiros hace un par de semanas, se apareció con comida, lleno de compasión por la comunidad. Hay un nivel de compenetración que ha estado presente aquí, en medio de todo esto”.La planificación para otras vigilias de oración, manifestaciones y actos también se encuentra en marcha, en tanto la comunidad comienza a hacerle frente a la difícil labor a largo plazo de reconstruir la confianza y emprender la reconciliación.Chuck Wynder, misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal para la justicia y la defensa social dijo que ha estado trabajando estrechamente con sus colegas el Misionero para la Reconciliación Racial, Heidi Kim, y con Alex Baumgarten, que dirige la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales de la Iglesia “para ver cómo podemos acompañar a la gente aquí y cómo podemos apoyar a la diócesis y a la comunidad”.“Queremos cerciorarnos de que nuestro testimonio y nuestra defensa social está presente tanto en la localidad como en la Iglesia a nivel denominacional y facilitar nuestra respuesta misional de manera que otras partes de la Iglesia más allá de Ferguson y de la Diócesis de Misurí sepan que la Iglesia está presente en medio de todo esto”, afirmó.El Rdo. Mike Angell que, como misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal para los jóvenes adultos y el ministerio universitario, está radicado en San Luis, dijo que escribió un pliego de preguntas y respuestas para ayudar a los estudiantes universitarios y jóvenes adultos a discutir las ramificaciones de la tragedia de Ferguson. Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Advocacy Peace & Justice, Ferguson, Misurí: líderes de la Iglesia intentan ayudar a rehacer la confianza de la comunidad Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Florida priest cited for feeding homeless wants his day in…

first_img By Pat McCaughanPosted Nov 14, 2014 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC November 14, 2014 at 6:43 pm Martha, in Ft. Lauderdale it became a criminal offense to carry out our regular course of feeding the hungry–“following in the footsteps of Jesus”–on October 31, 2014. How ironic that on Halloween Night, when millions of people in this country were ritually handing out food on streets and driveways to anyone who asked, it became illegal to hand out food to the homeless and hungry on the streets of Ft. Lauderdale. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA November 14, 2014 at 5:17 pm When did feeding those in need become a criminal offense following in the footsteps of Jesus? Youth Minister Lorton, VA November 17, 2014 at 1:24 pm The real mark of courage will be when local law enforcement officers protest the injustice of this ordinance by refusing to enforce it as law. THAT witness will further serve to put institutional authorities on notice that they are indeed responsible for the charge that has been entrusted to their office. Stand strong brother! Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Florida priest cited for feeding homeless wants his day in court The Rev. Lucretia Jevne says: The Rev. Thomas Ryan says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 December 3, 2014 at 7:36 am ***(My previously posted comments were all incomplete per computer error!)***It’s always amazing to me how in this outright utterly disposable society of ours, Common human decency just gets thrown out the window!- Especially by those whom we’ve entrusted to be our so-called “Leaders!”… Nevermind that for those of us whom are Christians, this is totally a violation of our constitutional rights; being persecuted for religious beliefs & the right to practice those beliefs! (The very rights that a large number of our Country’s homeless population fought wars to defend!) How about just a little human compassion & common decency?… Not just as citizens of this great Nation, but merely as brothers and sisters who share this planet!- Our political leaders should be in the forefront, using all of their contacts and the power of their platforms in a public outcry on “The World Stage” to promote a sort of “Global Treaty” to end hunger once and for all!… Let alone, to clothe, shelter, educate and otherwise care for those in need. Vicious convicted felons get better treatment in prisons the whole world over, for crying out loud!The real question is: “Where is our wonderful President when you need him?…(“Probably off vacationing as usual, frivolously spending our taxpaying dollars while our citizens go hungry!)- “What a damn shame!”ReplySpeak Your MindErin Mulvaney Name * Sanford Hampton says: November 15, 2014 at 1:42 pm I am a member of Episcopal Charities (Matthew 25 Committee) and I fully support Fr. Mark Sims. And knowing him like I do, I would expect no less. Keep up the good work. God’s peace and love, M November 14, 2014 at 7:13 pm If I am ever arrested for feeding the homeless and they want to know who told me to do this I will say I will say the Lord Jesus Christ told me to feed the hungry ,give drink to the thirsty and clothe the naked. Take it up with Him. Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Oliver Prescott Wilcox IV says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group November 18, 2014 at 7:47 am And Jesus was arrested and condemned … Unfortunately, after so many years of Gospel presence in our nation, this continues to be the path for the exercise of prophecy in our society. But your courage, Mark, is precisely what is needed to submit the “powers and dominions” to the spirit of the Kingdom. It is sad to realize that that our socio-political discourse in our “Christian nation” is becoming more and more exclusive! Keep doing the good work, Mark… Keep living the Gospel! November 17, 2014 at 3:31 pm Br. Hal, Thank you for your offer of help. I need all of the help I can get right now. I am determined to strike an acceptable covenant with the City of Ft. Lauderdale and provide shelter for all those who need it. Until that time, hungry people need to eat, and this can be done in an orderly and civil manner, which we in the Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida. Please support us with funds so that we can continue our mission to the hungry and homeless. Please visit our website at Episcopal Charities of Southeast Florida: ECSEFL.orgAll funds will be used solely for food and basic human needs. ECSEFL.orgYou may call me, Canon Mark Sims, at 954.806.7410.Friend me on Facebook: Mark SimsYou can follow the discussions, view the television interviews, and follow my legal challenge. Peace. November 14, 2014 at 11:37 pm Was Jesus speaking ironically when he said that the poor will always be with us? Why, because it is easier to make “the other” someone else’s problem. Bless all those who see need and respond with compassion and substance. November 15, 2014 at 9:35 pm Br. Jeremy… The Mayor of Fort Lauderdale and all but one of the City Commissioners, the ones who just passed this ordinance into law and are vowing to continue to enforce it until the feedings move off the streets and into controlled indoor spaces, are Democrats. Rector Martinsville, VA November 15, 2014 at 10:11 am I have been providing clean used men’s clothing in small Publix bags to our homeless for years and usually at traffic lights. I also sometimes give them hot coffee, donuts, power bars for nourishment.So, come arrest me to….I am guilty like Fr. Sims! God is crying!Chaplain Charles HumphriesMemorial Hospital, Hollywood martha knight says: The Rev. Harriet B. Linville says: Comments (28) Canon Mark Sims says: The Rev. Gail Vince says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Ruth W. Campbell says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Karen Morgan says: Erin Mulvaney says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest November 16, 2014 at 6:54 pm I work with Episcopal Community Services in Northern California. Many of our congregations have programs to feed the hungry. It is shocking that in this rich nation so many people have to go hungry. What we need to do is outlaw hunger not those who feed the hungry! dwight smith says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Martha I. Richards says: Featured Jobs & Calls Gregory C. Willmore says: Kitty Swain-Evans says: The Rev. Canon Mark H. Sims (wearing a stole), rector of St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church in Coral Springs, is issued with a criminal citation for feeding the homeless.[Episcopal News Service] A Florida priest who was issued a criminal citation for feeding homeless residents in a local park is fighting back.“I am suing the city of Fort Lauderdale for the right to continue to feed the homeless on city streets,” according to the Rev. Canon Mark H. Sims, rector of St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church in Coral Springs.Sims told the Episcopal News Service Nov. 13 that he has hired local attorneys Bill Scherer, a well-known trial lawyer, and Bruce Rogow, a constitutional lawyer who teaches at Nova Southeastern University, to defend him “in court against a criminal citation I was issued.“I want to fight the constitutionality of the ordinance that was passed. As someone issued a citation I have standing and I’m going to use that opportunity.”Scherer told the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel that the city ordinance, passed Oct. 31, which bans feeding of homeless in public places, is unconstitutional and discriminatory.Police arrive at Stranahan Park where Sims and others were feeding homeless residents.Local law enforcement officials halted Sims and two others from feeding homeless residents in Stranahan Park on Nov. 2. Sims, 57, said he was detained by police, fingerprinted, issued the citation and released. He is awaiting a court appearance date and faces a $500 fine and a possible 60 days in jail.“If I get sentenced to jail, I’m going to jail,” Sims said. “But, I’m willing to stay there [in jail] for the right to compassionately feed people who are living on the street,” he added.City officials have said they want feeding programs moved indoors but Sims and others say there are simply not enough locations to accommodate growing numbers of homeless families and individuals.“I am determined to allow people to be able to compassionately feed the homeless and people who are hungry on the streets of Florida. I don’t see how we can pass an ordinance that restricts human decency,” added Sims, who has created a legal defense fund on “gofundme.com” and expects “a tough challenge in court.”He vowed to continue to feed homeless people and on Nov. 12 joined others doing just that at a local beach.“The Episcopal Church in this diocese feeds people every single day through one of several agencies,” Sims said. “We have on-site places that we use and there are so many social service agencies we have created in Southeastern Florida to help families and individuals as much as we can, but there are still not enough.”As chair of the board of the Episcopal Charities of Southeastern Florida “we just funded for a two-year cycle $600,000 worth of grants to parishes with at least half of that going to programs that are caring for the feeding of hungry people, homeless people and the elderly,” Sims said.Typically, during winter months families and individuals who are homeless migrate to Florida from colder climates, so there has been a noticeable uptick in their numbers locally, he said.On Sunday, Nov. 9, members of his parish returned to the park and served a hot meal of sautéed chicken, rice, vegetables and dessert and distributed “takeout bags of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and apples. We saw more women than we normally see. It was a bit surprising and a bit sad,” Sims said.But he added that “the city wants them off the streets. They don’t want to do anything to encourage them to be able to stay on the streets. The problem is, there’s no place else to go. They want to make it someone else’s problem.”Feeding people who are homeless is nothing new for Sims, who said “this has been going on since I was in seminary in 1999 and before that when I was a parishioner in South Florida. I’ve been doing this for 20 years.”His goal, he said, is for city officials to rescind the ordinance “and I want to sit down with a clean slate and help rework it.”Meanwhile, local, national and international church communities have rallied in support of Sims, according to the Rev. Canon Donna Dambrot, Episcopal Charities executive director. She compared his legal struggle to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s nonviolent resistance to unjust laws.The area has “seen an amazing increase in homelessness and hunger needs,” Dambrot added. “When Fort Lauderdale adopted this ordinance there was already feeding going on in the streets. We’ve gotten … requests for additional funding because the need is so great and food pantries have run out of food and their access to government sources of food is not available.”She said ECSF “serves hundreds of thousands of meals a year” through partner agencies and that she has noticed at least a 10 percent increase recently in numbers of meals served.The issue of homelessness is complex and layered, she added. “We have people come out of the woods and the mangroves in the [Florida] Keys; there are homeless folks living in encampments. In Pompano Beach, they’re sleeping under the highway. We even have some people living in canoes in the water, who come ashore to food pantries in Key West.”There are levels of homelessness, including those who are temporarily without housing who receive job skills and employment training and eventually find permanent living arrangements.“There is also that layer of folks we serve at St. Lawrence Chapel and our Jubilee Center in South Broward, that will be chronically homeless,” she said. “It’s an ongoing challenge and we’ll be in this for a long time.”Yet, she added that Sims’ advocacy has inspired others “to take those steps necessary to change what we perceive as unjust regulations.” Sims, the agency and the church community are all simply attempting to respond to Jesus’ directives to help others.“We follow Matthew 25,” which emphasizes Jesus’s call to serve those in need, she said. “That is our road map. That is our intentional vocational mission.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. The Rev’d Carl Byrd, Sr. says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC November 14, 2014 at 5:49 pm Thank you for taking a stand Rev. “If you live me…” “Pure religion and undefiled before the Father is this…” “Oh mortal what does The Lord your God require of you, but to do justice…”Keep on feeding. Rector Bath, NC Canon Mark Sims says: PJ Cabbiness says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon Mark Sims says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET November 18, 2014 at 5:46 am I am the Director of a Federal Summer Food Service Program (USDA) out of Church of the Holy Spirit Orleans Cape Cod MA -Food for Kids. A faith based organization partnering with a federal program which feeds children in the summer who qualify for free/reduced meals during the school year. We do this at open meal sites in playgrounds, and in school yards in census based poverty rural areas . Would you stop this program in your community too! Micah 6:8 Canon Jesus Reyes says: Rev’d Charles Humphries says: Ed Cimler says: John Covert says: Press Release Service Brother Jeremy, CSJW says: November 15, 2014 at 12:08 am This arrest is so ludicrous I cannot believe I am actually responding to it. Perhaps there is not enough crime in Fort Lauderdale – or perhaps they have too many policemen with nothing to do. All over the world those who can, feed and clothe the homeless and destitute. Christ said, whatever you do to the least of these you do to me – (my own translation). We are charged to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, heal the sick… if a man or woman of the cloth cannot minister to the homeless and needy without fear of being persecuted by the law, then I think we must be living in another place other than the USA!! Look at what the newly elected Pope Francis is doing in the world – for God’s sake, don’ disgrace the entire nation by following through with this in-humane act and process. Perhaps the police and those in charge should stand back and get a better view of what they are doing – there for the Grace of God go they (homeless) and pray that they are never in the same situation. November 15, 2014 at 6:07 pm You lost me Brother Jeremy when you introduced politics into this. I think that Jesus would also approve of Republicans also feeding the hungry. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH November 16, 2014 at 11:08 pm Shame on the city government of Fort Lauderdale for passing such a dispicable piece of garbage as a city ordinance! They, like so many other municipalities, are taking the easy way out. Rather then face up to the real problems of the homeless, they counter the teachings of Jesus and simply look the other way. Watch out that this doesn’t happen in your own cities and towns. Be active and follow the activities of your local government. Don’t let them do this to the homeless and the good Christian people who simply want to help the unfortunate. November 16, 2014 at 8:21 pm We faced a similar challenge in 2003 and “the whole damn bar” joined to help us win the right to shelter children in our own home. Parks are one thing, and public or private land is another. I’m sure the owners of beachfront lots would be glad to lease you a vacant lot that would be more convenient for your homeless diners.See RLUIPA.ORG for your answer. Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK November 14, 2014 at 5:17 pm I am a retired priest from the Diocese of Southeast Florida and former Chair of Social Concerns, Convenor for Outreach Programs, and Diocesan Representative for Jubilee Ministries to the Episcopal Church. This issue of feeding and caring for the homeless has long been a ministry of several parishes and Jubilee Centers of the Diocese of Southeast Florida. About 25 years ago we established a parish grant program supported by the diocesan budget for the purpose of assisting congregations in the development of ministries such as the meal program at St. Mary Magdelene . It is truly a blessing that those programs have continued in this faithful ministry.My continued prayers for their work. November 14, 2014 at 10:30 pm I guess they would have arrested Jesus and fined him for feeding the 5000. They also could have charged him with practicing medicine without a license. It is interesting to notice that in spite of the blatant religiousity in our society, anyone actually following Jesus will be persecuted. I wonder if they will outlaw the reading on Matthew 25:31-46 on The Feast of Christ the King? (Well, as for me and my house, we will serve the Lord…which of course means I am a Democrat,…see Matthew 25:31-46 ) Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Rev. Christopher Johnson says: Colin McAfee says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI November 14, 2014 at 7:16 pm This what we are called to do and be! Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ November 14, 2014 at 4:19 pm So living out the Second Great Commandment is considered criminal activity in Florida. Unfortunately typical of the times in which we live. Br. Hal Weiner, OUM says: November 19, 2014 at 12:53 pm “The real mark of courage will be when local law enforcement officers protest the injustice of this ordinance by refusing to enforce it as law.”Wouldn’t that be something to see! November 24, 2014 at 7:56 am To attempt to prevent a Priest from feeding the hungry………despicable. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Paula Lorraine Pavanis says: November 15, 2014 at 11:49 pm Enough frivolity. How can we help? Please send his e mail and mailing addressof the Church in Ft.Lauderdale. Rector Smithfield, NC November 15, 2014 at 11:07 am Karen, I am glad that you are responding to this issue and the fact that it is a criminal violation to feed the homeless under most circumstances here in Ft. Lauderdale. This is very real. We are fighting hard to simply follow the example Jesus established for us. Be vocal. Pray. Spread the word. Contribute. And, most of all, thank you!Blessings, Canon Mark Sims+ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Rector Tampa, FL November 14, 2014 at 8:12 pm My middle son was threatened with arrest for attempting to distribute oranges to homeless people in downtown Seattle on Christmas morning several years ago. November 16, 2014 at 12:46 pm I agree and am a Republican!Matthew 25! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Iain Stanford named Giving Tuesday Scholar at CDSP

first_img Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA [Church Divinity School of the Pacific press release] Iain Stanford is the new Giving Tuesday Scholar at Church Divinity School of the Pacific, Dean and President W. Mark Richardson announced.Stanford, a postulant to the priesthood from the Diocese of Oregon, earned a Master of Divinity degree from the University of Notre Dame, a Master of Theology degree from Harvard Divinity School and has completed coursework for Doctorate of Theology at Harvard. At CDSP, Stanford is enrolled in the Certificate of Anglican Studies program and will work on his dissertation.The new Giving Tuesday scholarship, one of several new scholarships that CDSP offers for 2015-2016, was made possible by CDSP donors who participated in Giving Tuesday, an initiative that encourages people to give online on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. In 2014, CDSP’s Giving Tuesday raised more than $10,000.“When we initiated Giving Tuesday at CDSP, an idea originating with [CDSP’s development director] Patrick Delahunt, we had no idea what to expect,” said Richardson. “It is exciting to know that the generosity of those who responded will have this kind of impact on a student’s life. We’re delighted to welcome Iain to CDSP, and grateful for the generosity of the donors who made our new Giving Tuesday scholarship possible. This is just one of several new scholarships now available from CDSP, thanks to the extraordinary generosity of alumni and donors who have contributed to funds through estate plans and endowed gifts.”Other new CDSP scholarship opportunities include the full-tuition Bishop’s Scholarships, which are given on the nomination of students’ diocesan bishops; the Presidential Scholarship, which includes tuition, room and board, meal plan and books for an exceptional leader age 35 or under; and Excellence in Ministry scholarships that include full tuition and a stipend.For his part, Stanford is thrilled to be in Berkeley. “One of the opportunities of being a student at CDSP is I get to go and experience different communities in the area. It’s a chance for me to get to know what’s available on the West Coast. I have an ability and opportunity just to experience the breadth of what the Episcopal Church can be.”To learn more about scholarship and financial aid opportunities at CDSP, contact the Rev. Andrew Hybl ’12 at 510-204-0715 or [email protected] Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI People, Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Theological Education Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Posted Mar 16, 2015 Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Iain Stanford named Giving Tuesday Scholar at CDSP Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CAlast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

Bruce Caldwell to be provisional bishop of Lexington

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Episcopal Diocese of Lexington] The Rt. Rev. Bruce Caldwell will serve the Episcopal Diocese of Lexington as its provisional bishop following affirmation from the clergy and laity attending a Special Convention on May 14 at Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Winchester, Kentucky.Caldwell served the Episcopal Diocese of Wyoming as bishop for 13 years, ending his tenure in 2010. Since then, Caldwell has served as the interim spiritual leader of St. Mark’s Cathedral, Minneapolis, Minnesota, as well as assisting bishop in the Episcopal Diocese of New York. He currently lives in Minneapolis with his family.Since March 9, the Episcopal Diocese of Lexington has been under the ecclesiastical authority of the Standing Committee, an elected body of clergy and lay leaders, following the suspension of Doug Hahn as the bishop of Lexington. Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry, working through the canonical disciplinary and pastoral processes of the church, took this action after learning that Hahn had a sexual relationship with an adult female parishioner and intentionally withheld this information when seeking the position of bishop.Curry visited the diocese and attended the May 14 Special Convention to offer pastoral support. The convention also received greetings from Caldwell, who will officially begin as provisional bishop on June 1.Upon hearing the news that convention elected to place the diocese under his oversight, Caldwell said, “I am excited, and I am looking forward to getting to work.”A special Eucharist to welcome Caldwell is planned for June 18 at Christ Church Cathedral in Lexington. Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem People Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR House of Bishops, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL center_img Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Posted May 20, 2016 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bruce Caldwell to be provisional bishop of Lexington Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

California Supreme Court upholds ruling in San Joaquin property case

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA July 18, 2016 at 1:20 pm I am active in my local Episcopal Church. I’m not leaving. This issue of “breakaways” hits home with me because it has partly involved friends who were pillars in our church. They were the constants, the old reliables, loyal, a family whose ancestors founded the church, a family with an Episcopal missionary among them, educated, world-traveled — and these and others felt betrayed by a Church that they felt had “left us”. They could recount with anguish a Church that they felt was out of control and not living in honesty with its own standards: notable bishops and other clergy who denied the Resurrection, others who openly denied that Christ is the unique and sufficient Incarnation of God (never equal to others and surpassing all others), clergy who denied that Christ invites the world to salvation through His works alone, winking at canonical standards, bishops flatly ignoring canons to pursue a personal revelation agenda in “their” diocese, disregard for restraints asked for by the larger Communion, and flat rejection of Communion-wide agreements on sensitive matters of sexuality. One bishop very famously denied that there were same gender weddings in his diocese (in order to get to go to Lambeth) when the reverse was proven. Such canonical disobedience was called “prophetic”. When the dissenters – like our friends – took their actions to distance themselves it was called “disloyalty”. Odd how that gets to be viewed that way. Time and General Convention has revealed that there is little room for dissent on issues that were formerly promoted as “all may — none must”. Many of the so-called “breakaways” were formerly praised as some of the most vital — soon they were villainized when they wanted to get away from all of this and just go with the stuff that they or their ancestors had bought and paid for and paid dearly to maintain. They became mocked as “just a few who don’t want to be with….us”. So, thirteen years later there have been thousands of our members lost to another emerging Anglican presence in this country. At least 5 dioceses left and in their wake there are mainly untenable remnants left which require great resources to maintain. Meanwhile our Sunday attendance, baptisms, and Sunday Schools are burying deeper into the negative. Cathedrals have closed. Seminaries have shuttered. People are staying away. Pockets of vitality are truly few.Any organization under such stress and decline would self-examine in painfully honest ways. So….some property has been gained back. And it will be empty. It will be costly to maintain. The larger Church will continue to underwrite the costs of struggling “continuing Episcopal dioceses”.If there is a “win”, then it is microscopic. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Property The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Leslie G Marshall says: Rector Tampa, FL F William Thewalt says: July 16, 2016 at 4:59 pm There is no winner in this matter. Ideologues from both sides have done tremendous damage to the Anglican people of the San Joaquin Valley. Christina Cleveland says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rev. Julian Hills says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing July 18, 2016 at 4:58 pm Remember, Our Lord works and speaks to us in very mysterious ways and if this was not the will of our Lord, it would not be. It is our challenge to pray and learn his true motive and message. I can’t help but believe it has a great deal to do with “Love thy neighbor as thyself.” July 22, 2016 at 8:31 am No…in a nutshell I described the reality of people being tagged “breakaways”. They have faces, histories of loyalty, and they bring a conversation that few want to hear. They can trace with clarity “the club’s” changing of its own standards when it suited, failure to discipline errant leaders when convenient, and the “club’s” increasing intolerance of anyone who didn’t go along with those things quietly. Curate Diocese of Nebraska July 27, 2016 at 3:46 pm Doug… yours is the most compelling explanation of all, as to what happened to those that had The Church crumble around their ears. The same thing happened at my Church. All those outre beliefs were present, PLUS we were also given Islamic readings to ponder, and meditate on (at the same time, blasting the Bible, over & over again.) Since I had been educating myself with the bible (with no help from TEC), I knew what to do. I just went to a plain Christian church –where the pastor was not ashamed of Jesus. God is good! Yet, 13 years later, I’m still heart-broken, to see a once-beautiful Church body, be so adulterous. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 30, 2016 at 7:14 pm You are right that many conservatives were underserved in the church but to leave and not fight on did everyone a great disservice. We should all pray fro forgiveness. [Episcopal News Service] The California Supreme Court on July 13 “declined to review” a decision made in April by a state appellate court putting an end to eight years of litigation and awarding 28 properties worth an estimated $50 million to the continuing Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.“Accordingly, the original judgment in favor of the Diocese and ordering the return of the properties and funds (approximately twenty-eight properties, including ECCO and the Cathedral, and various Diocesan funds) stands,” said Michael Glass, diocesan chancellor, in a July 14 statement to the diocese.“It is my belief that the leadership of the Anglican Diocese intends to work with the Diocese to provide for an orderly, thoughtful, and pastoral transition of the properties,” he added.Three remaining parish cases, St. John’s in Porterville, St. Paul’s in Visalia and St. Columba in Fresno, will now resume, said Glass in the statement.In describing the situation, San Joaquin Bishop David Rice made an analogy to air travel. “…It has been an extraordinarily long flight, suffice it to say, the flight was challenging, sometimes turbulent, and certainly at times less than comfortable.  And I trust the thought occurred to all those on board once-or-twice, will this thing ever land?  Landed it has.  We are on the runway and the tarmac upon which we find ourselves is unfamiliar to us, that’s what eight years will do.  And if you allow me to continue with the image for a moment longer; we are sitting on the tarmac and the attendant has indicated that the seatbelt sign is still on,” he said.“Faithful ones of the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, this is the most important point I wish to convey. The seatbelt sign remains illuminated. It is not time yet to get up and empty the compartments overhead, nor is it time to deplane.  We need to sit a bit longer.  And patient we have been, particularly those who have been waiting for eight long years, what a flight eh!  But sit a bit longer we must.”He then reiterated a position he’s long held to.“I have suggested in the past that we assume a position of prayerful restraint,” said Rice. “There will be an appropriate time and place for celebration.  What we do now, which is what we are always called to do, is to give thanks to God that we are Called to be… And the ways in which we continue to emerge in this Jesus Movement remains our focus.”In December 2007 a majority of the diocese’s congregations voted to realign with the Argentina-based Anglican Province of the Southern Cone, taking properties belonging to the church with them. In a statement on its website, the bishop of the Anglican Diocese of San Joaquin said the diocese would comply with the July 13 ruling.Earlier this year, the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin and the Episcopal Church received a decision April 5 from the Fifth District Court of Appeal affirming the judgment issued in 2014 by Fresno Superior Court that ruled that the breakaway Anglican diocese had no legal right to the property, including St. James Cathedral Fresno, the Evergreen Conference Center in Oakhurst and various other properties belonging to the diocese.Property disputes between the Episcopal Church and other breakaway groups in Fort Worth and South Carolina are ongoing. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC George J Wade says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 21, 2016 at 6:19 pm So in a nutshell, you feel it is alright to quit the club if you disagree with the direction the club is going and take the clubhouse with you? I should think not! Susan W. Morrison says: Doug Desper says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Pamela Kruse-Buckingham says: July 18, 2016 at 6:46 pm The courts in South Carolina and Texas ruled for the conservative breakaway dioceses. Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab jim davis says: Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls California Supreme Court upholds ruling in San Joaquin property case Decision signals an end to eight years of litigation July 30, 2016 at 7:10 pm As a conservative I would agree with you Doug but there was much uncanonical moves on the other side of the divide as well and much I read was tinted with bigotry. I remain in the loyal opposition in my church and with logic and love pesevere through many a peversity. Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By ENS staffPosted Jul 14, 2016 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Terry Francis says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 20, 2016 at 4:27 pm In a July 13 letter to the Anglican diocese, their bishop stated:“Now is the time for us to begin the process of handing over the properties. We will work with TEC to do this in as gracious and orderly a manner as possible.”May we Episcopalians also exhibit grace – and mercy, too – starting with gifting the Anglican diocese properties that do not have adequate Episcopal congregations waiting to fill them.Yes, I realize that eight years ago the Anglican diocese did not exhibit grace and mercy toward continuing Episcopalians, causing tremendous grief and distress for many people, and to this day, they continue to treat gays like lepers. However, if you’re thinking of doing unto them what they did unto us, you definitely need to do some immediate remedial gospel reading. No prayer or “discernment” needed here! Rector Collierville, TN jim davis says: July 24, 2016 at 8:17 pm I totally agree with Doug Desper regarding this issue. The reason so many of these dioceses broke away is because sharing and spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ had taken a distance back seat to leftward-leaning political activism in TEC. The notion that different points of view are welcome in this church was and is quite simply, a shame. If you express the view for instance, that we should take control of our borders in regards to immigration, you’re a racist. If you express the belief that same-sex marriages go against Biblical teaching you’re a hate-filled closed-minded intolerant homophobic bigot. Is it any wonder so many chose to leave! So to the Diocese of San Joaquin I say rejoice in your hard-won “victory” and the retaining of your precious property. So what if many conservative and traditional Episcopalians are now left out in the cold! I hope it was worth it. Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA July 17, 2016 at 8:51 pm Time and again the courts have found in favor of the established Episcopal Church and against the breakaway groups, We must have a clear legal case to ownership of Diocesan property. It also seems like plain common sense that a Diocese has a continuing interest in the property it owns, When will these breakaway groups realize there is no free lunch, especially one gained by stealing. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 20, 2016 at 7:55 pm There are Episcopalians that were left out in the cold when all this happened. We have a parishioner that moved from Alameda to Tracy to live near family due to health reasons, and there is no Episcopal Priest to go and visit her. So sad. It’s a very long trip for one of our Priests or LEM’s to get all the way to Tracy to give communion. I pray for the healing of the Church in the Jan Joaquin Valley, and I pray that some Priests get out there soon. Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 18, 2016 at 10:18 am The word “continuing” in paragraph 1 is surely misleading, since that word has been used by Anglican but non-Episcopal Church groups — including “breakaways” referred to later in the article. I had to click on the diocesan link to be sure I knew which “diocese” was being referred to, and recommend that the editor revise that sentence. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Doug Desper says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments (14) PJ Cabbiness says: Brian A. MacFarland says: last_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

After building an inviting new parish hall, an Ohio church…

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA By Egan MillardPosted Jun 6, 2019 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York After building an inviting new parish hall, an Ohio church asks the community to make it their own Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN The completed campus of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Lakewood, Ohio. Photo: Barrett T. Newman/St. Peter’s Episcopal Church[Episcopal News Service] If you’d walked by the corner of Detroit Avenue and West Clifton Boulevard in downtown Lakewood, Ohio, a year ago, you would have seen an impressive but imposing neo-Gothic church attached to a drab brick building with air conditioners sprouting from rusted window frames. It might’ve been hard to tell whether anything was happening at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, with its fortress-like stone walls and dark wooden doors. Though its stained-glass windows are dazzling from the inside, you would have seen nothing but opaque black glass.Walk past the same corner in this cheerful Cleveland suburb today and you’ll see the same church, but the adjoining building has been replaced by a modern addition that curves out toward the street. Through its floor-to-ceiling glass windows, you might see a choir rehearsal, a Bible study, a piano recital, or even a yoga class. As striking as the new building is, your eye would be drawn to the people inside.That transformation is the basis for a new mission at St. Peter’s. What started as a project to rebuild the aging parish hall became an opportunity to make the parish more accessible and invite the larger community in. Rather than limiting the new building to church-related usage and income-generating space rentals, St. Peter’s is inviting its neighbors to approach the building with their own ideas – and on their own terms.“The whole building is designed to invite people in,” said the Rev. Keith Owen II, rector of St. Peter’s. “And we’re basically saying to the community, ‘Come and look at this building and help us imagine what we can do in here.’”The $3.5 million project originated a decade ago, when parish leaders realized that the 1950s parish hall – which housed the parish offices, several classrooms and the church’s long-running day care center – had reached the end of its useful life and was beyond repair.“The old building was obsolete, falling down and inhospitable,” Owen told Episcopal News Service. “It was hopelessly out of compliance with all current building codes. If we even tried to rehabilitate any part of that building, all of the current building codes would have come into effect, which would have effectively shut down our day care center.”And the building was a nightmare for elderly or handicapped parishioners.“If you were mobility-impaired, it was flat-out impossible for you to meet with the rector in his office. You just couldn’t get there. There were eight or nine different levels” between the church and the parish hall, said parishioner Fred Purdy.“So, for all those reasons, we decided we needed to do a complete tear-down and build a new one,” Owen said.The new building solves the access problems with an elevator and a hallway that gently slopes from the entrance up to the narthex, where it connects to the church without any steps. But it presented an opportunity to make the parish more accessible in other ways, too. As beautiful as the 1920s church building is, you can’t see in or out. The old parish hall suffered from similar visibility issues.“The building could be full of people and, from the outside, you’d never know it,” said Owen.“We wanted to make sure the community could see in,” echoed parishioner Lorna Jordan. “Nobody knows what’s going on inside.”The architectural solution, of course, was glass – so much glass that Owen is convening a “Squeegee Squad” of parish volunteers to clean it all on a regular basis. From the parish offices to the lounge to the day care center, the building is flooded with natural light. A courtyard with a small prayer garden sits in the center of the new church complex. But the focal point of the project is the section closest to the street: a multipurpose space called the Chapel of the Confession of St. Peter.To highlight its flexibility, the chapel is decidedly minimalist, with plain white walls, large windows and no fixed pews. There will be one major decorative element, though: a specially commissioned icon of the biblical scene the chapel is named for, in which Jesus asks his apostles who they believe he is, and Peter replies that he is the son of God.The chapel will be used for smaller services, choir practices and parish group meetings, but it also represents a new outreach opportunity for the church. Along with the other mission projects that currently operate on the property – such as the affordable day care center and a free meal program – this multipurpose space is intended as a gift to the community, an open invitation to the people of Lakewood to decide how they want to use it.“Our function as a parish truly resides in the community at large,” said Purdy. “It’s our intention that it be utilized as the community finds to its benefit.”“We’re kind of putting our feelers out in the community,” said Jordan. The parish will celebrate the grand opening of the new building on Sunday, June 9, with Lakewood’s mayor and the bishop of Ohio in attendance, and Jordan hopes that will encourage people to reach out with their ideas for how to use the space.Potential uses suggested by Owen and parishioners include concerts, crafting, tai chi, dance classes, town hall meetings, lectures, meals, art shows, and an emergency homeless shelter on dangerously cold winter nights. Currently, there are no plans to charge rental fees for nonprofit events. Owen said the parish has offered the space to Beck Center for the Arts – a performing arts theater two blocks away – as it undergoes a building project of its own.Owen explained, “We basically said to them, ‘Here’s this beautiful, acoustically alive room, and you’re getting ready to tear your building down and rebuild it, so use it! Here it is! Use it!’ And they were kind of like, ‘What? Really? For free?’ And we said, ‘Yeah, for free!’”Whatever activities the community brings to the new space in the years to come, the project has already changed the dynamic between the parish and the surrounding neighborhood. With so much glass, it feels like the space doesn’t really have walls at all. The distinction between inside and outside – or secular and religious – seems to fade.“Now, nothing can go on in that building that cannot be seen from outside,” Owen said. “People can see in and we see out, so there’s a kind of communication going on between the community and the congregation that never went on before.”And if you happen to walk past at a time when there are no events in the building, there will still be something inside the new chapel that catches your eye: that one-of-a-kind icon. At five feet by four feet, it will be “unavoidably visible from the street,” said Owen, who spoke to ENS while driving back to Ohio after picking up the icon in Florida.“[That was] something we didn’t really plan,” he said. “It just kind of happened.“And it asks the question of us at St. Peter’s and it asks the question of people stopped at the stoplight at the intersection of Detroit and West Clifton and people walking by on the sidewalk, ‘Who do you say that I am?’”– Egan Millard is a freelance reporter based in the Boston area and a member of the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Massachusetts. 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June 20, 2021 0