Month: June 2021

Violent scenes during Rathkeale daylight street brawl

first_imgGARDAI in Newcastle West are investigating the circumstances surrounding a violent, inter-family brawl that broke out on the Main Street of Rathkeale leading to the arrest if two men at the scene.At lunchtime last Thursday, one man is understood to have attacked another individual by using a key as a weapon and this sparked the introduction of more than a dozen people to the incident which is said to have escalated.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Gardai were despatched to the scene and four patrol cars were present with members of the force there to bring the situation under control and quell tensions.Two men were arrested in the wake of the violent scenes but senior gardai said that no other weapons were used or produced during the course of the dispute. They were being questioned on suspicion of carrying out serious assaults.Those arrested, two males, one in his 40s and the other in his 30s were questioned at Newcastle West garda Station and later separately released. Files are being constructed and a number of statements have been taken with a view that a completed file would be sent to the Director of Public Prosecutions/Further arrests are likely but gardai are adamant to conduct their investigations. Twitter Print WhatsApp NewsBreaking newsViolent scenes during Rathkeale daylight street brawlBy Staff Reporter – August 8, 2014 510 Advertisementcenter_img Linkedin Facebook Email Previous articleRapist jailed over traumatic taxi hijackNext articleHostages critical of justice system Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ielast_img read more


June 4, 2021 0

Council announces ‘Living City’ management team

first_img TAGSlimerickLimerick City and County CouncilLiving City RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live  LIMERICK City and County Council has announced that a team has been established to manage the roll out of the ‘Living City’ initiative to regenerate a core part of the city centre.The initiative offers income tax deductions to people carrying out refurbishment of homes and retail spaces that have been designated as Special Regeneration Areas of historic Limerick.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The scheme also includes the centres of five other Irish cities – Dublin, Cork, Galway, Waterford and Kilkenny – and is divided into residential and commercial elements.The residential element will offer an income tax deduction, over 10 years, for qualifying expenditure on the refurbishment or conversion of a building for use as a dwelling.To qualify, the building must be built before 1915 and be located in one of the designated areas in the city. The residential tax relief is only available to owner/occupiers and is not on offer to landlords.The commercial relief is given in the form of an accelerated capital allowance for qualifying expenditure on refurbishment or conversion of premises within the special regeneration areas and is not restricted to pre-1915 buildings.The amount of tax relief available under the commercial element of the incentive is capped at €200,000 for any individual project.Limerick City and County Council’s director of Economic Development and Planning, Pat Daly said: “We are particularly welcoming individuals and families interested in participating in the scheme to explore the opportunities now available and to come speak with us – we all want to reinvigorate Georgian Limerick, bring it back to its former glory and encourage family life into the heart of our city.“Furthermore the commercial incentives offered will enhance the retail offer within the city centre as well as supporting employment generation. It is anticipated that this initiative will be supported by other advancements currently underway by the Council including the development of the former Opera Site, The Hanging Gardens site on Henry Street as well as building on completed schemes such as the Quays Project and the Coca Cola Bike scheme.”Those interested in participating in the scheme should contact [email protected] [email protected], or go to www.limerick.ie/council/living-city-initiative-limerick WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Facebook Email Advertisementcenter_img Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WhatsApp Previous articleConnecting creativity in Bealtaine festNext articleFlush and go John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Linkedin Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Print NewsCouncil announces ‘Living City’ management teamBy John Keogh – May 15, 2015 895 last_img read more


June 4, 2021 0

It’s up close and personal in University Hospital Limerick’s emergency department

first_imgNewsIt’s up close and personal in University Hospital Limerick’s emergency departmentBy Bernie English – December 3, 2018 4624 WhatsApp IT’S midnight at University Hospital Limerick and there are trolleys stacked one and two deep along the corridors in the emergency department.This is not a bank holiday weekend nor a Saturday night drunk tank. It’s Tuesday, November 20 and they have run out of trolleys.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Earlier this evening, the very waiting room of the emergency department was so crowded that people were sitting on the floor for lack of chairs.As a journalist, I have been writing about this situation, listening to staff, patients and families describe it for years.Now, I’m seeing this horror as a patient on one of those trolleys.I’ve been told I need a bed in hospital and I expect a long wait. I’m seen within half an hour of arriving and examined within a couple of hours. I’m told they will find a trolley and I have an IV inserted.Then it all stops.There are no trolleys. Outside the treatment area of the emergency department, where patients wait to be called for examination and treatment, they have run out of chairs. People are sitting on the floor or in wheelchairs. These are almost all patients and the few who have brought support are accompanied by just one person, not a contingent of family or mates.The wait is so long that a doctor comes out to ask if he can inject me with intravenous antibiotics there in the waiting area.It’s far from ideal but these are dedicated people whose first concern is treating patients as best they can.Later in the evening, I’m brought to a corridor where patients are lined up end to end. It’s nothing short of dystopian.The lady behind me – a pensioner who arrived as an emergency with no nightwear, change of clothes or any kind of comforts – was on a trolley for more than 30 hours since Monday morning.The woman in front of me, who looks even older, has also been waiting since Monday. Of six of us in this corridor, I can see that three of us could have been treated in a bed in Ennis, St John’s or Nenagh Hospitals. That’s where they are hoping to send us.We don’t need to be here.But the only other way into a hospital bed is through the Medical Assessment Units and their appointments are all booked days ahead. Respiratory disease like pneumonia won’t hang around.My GP is one of the many who send their patients here as their only hope of getting them a bed.A look around the immediate vicinity reveals trolleys staggered two on two in the area around the nurses station, where the most critical patients are being kept.In every direction, there are occupied trolleys and I’m told there are more in places that I can’t see.The isolation bays have also been pressed into use.Some patients are resigned to the long wait. Some are in desperate discomfort. The trolleys are unimaginably uncomfortable, narrow and padded with just a couple of inches of foam. Elderly people, with bones frail as sparrow skeletons are tossing and turning to find some comfort.They’ve run out of blankets, which is not a problem in my particular neck of the woods because the body heat is turning the corridor into a sauna.Every member of staff in this department is unfailingly courteous, professional and kind.But it is clear they are stretched to breaking point.The nurse taking blood pressure has to slide her equipment between the wall and the trolleys. There’s barely room for her to use it.Two people pushing equipment or a wheelchair cannot pass in this space. If they meet one has to back up.I remark to the nurse about the sheer density of people, some of them who can walk and some who could not move if there was an emergency.“What happens if there’s a fire?” I ask. Her face is grim when she answers. “There hasn’t been a fire”. The word that hangs unsaid is “yet”.It can’t be stressed enough that we are all people diagnosed as being ill enough to need a proper bed in a hospital ward. That we are receiving any treatment at all is a testament to the dedication of the staff.But treatment requires that doctors ask patients questions. Personal ones, in an environment where there is no privacy whatever.We try not to listen but after the first doctor’s round, one woman has had to talk about her severe psychiatric condition and her need for medication.We know that another young woman is taking the contraceptive pill. A man further along is being treated for alcoholic liver disease.If anyone here has a sexually transmitted disease, you could put money on them taking the risk of not revealing it and suffering the possible consequences.There’s no choice for medical staff but to discuss these matters here. Diagnosis and the administration of drugs must be based on medication already prescribed.Most of us hope we will never see any of our fellow patients again. We are all now in possession of information we didn’t want to hear or reveal.A young man who has been with us in the corridor for several hours is taken away to a private bay. When I meet him later on the way to the toilet, he is wearing a cardboard mask across his mouth.He tells me they suspect he may have TB. I can’t be sure if that is correct but it’s evident they are now taking precautions against something they fear is infectious.It’s 4am and sleep is only possible in snatches. The lights are on full blast, the noise from the porters and security guard station around the corner is beyond loud and people are passing through constantly. Because it is, after all, a corridor.Medical staff have to shout out patients’ names to find the person they have been sent to administer to. A vague description of location – in our case, ‘resuc (resuscitation) corridor’ is all the have to go on.Throughout the night, porters arrive enquiring if there are free trolleys. At one stage, another patient on a trolley has to be put in this area.An exasperated nurse asks “where, for God’s sake?”There is not an inch of room for the new arrival. Already, I could comb the hair of the woman on the next trolley with my toes, we are pushed so close together.We are asked if we would like something to help us sleep and most say yes, but nothing comes of it.When I see my own notes afterwards, they say “patient slept comfortably”.There are three toilets in the immediate area. One is out of order, another has a trolley across the door and at 2am, the third one is filthy, with bits of toilet tissue, stains and splashes covering the floor area. The toilet seat itself is destroyed with urine. There’s one cleaner on duty and I point out the problem but two hours later it’s still in the same disgusting state.There are other facilities outside the doors of the emergency department. For those who can walk to them.There’s nowhere to wash the sweat off or to change clothes. A woman trying to put on pyjamas in the corridor abandons all hope of modesty and does her best to change when no-one is looking.Sandwiches, soup and tea arrive during the evening on a push-cart. By the time they reach the third trolley, they’ve run out of soup.A sandwich is the only food anyone can expect until morning, provided they don’t run out of those.Around 8am, a team of doctors led by a consultant arrive to speak to the elderly lady in front of me. The consultant turns to his team to order that she is prioritised for a bed.Her daughters come to visit a little later but there is nowhere for them to sit so they stand beside her, moving aside every time someone else needs to get past. A private conversation is impossible but she tells them they have promised to get her on to a ward.“Hardly worth my while, now,” she says stoically.By 4pm on Wednesday, 28 hours after I arrive at the emergency department, an ambulance crew member calls my name and announces he’s taking me and another patient to Ennis. The prioritised elderly lady is still on her trolley.I’m no hero, but I tell a nurse I don’t want a bed ahead of this unfortunate woman. I’m told her needs have to be catered for here, at the acute hospital. Eventually.The journey to Ennis hospital feels like a prison break and as I close the door on my spacious, spotless, one-patient public room, I feel as if I have made a lucky escape. Advertisement Print Linkedincenter_img Email Twitter Facebook Previous articlePat Kinevane and BEFORE at the BelltableNext articleLimerick goes wild for tourism campaign Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news.last_img read more


June 4, 2021 0

O’Donovan welcomes major investment in Limerick

first_imgTwitter Email The Rev William Casey (Rev Willie C) memorial, Abbeyfeale.Photo: Cian Reinhardt Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Print WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live LIMERICK TD and Minister for the Office of Public Works, Patrick O’Donovan has welcomed a major investment by Minister Hildegarde Naughton TD for road works including pedestrian crossings, footpaths, lighting, drainage and safety measures across the County. Linkedin WhatsApp “Communities across Limerick will benefit from substantial investment for their areas. Various different projects are being included for towns and villages like the installation of pedestrian crossings or the removal of difficult flooding problems off of sections of road.”“As TD for the County I would have identified most of these needs to Limerick City and County Council and have met local area engineers to get these matters pushed forwards.”“This investment by Government is also important because it is an important injection of €2million which will allow for local construction works in several of our communities.”Minister O’Donovan also pointed out that the works in question will make the areas where the roads and footpaths are being repaired or installed safer for pedestrians and other road users.“The recent COVID restrictions have seen a major rise in the numbers of people walking so this money will help those areas to be safer and allow more people to use our footpaths and roads more safely.” Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Advertisement Previous articleFlooding on graves in St Mary’s cemetery PatrickswellNext articleAhead of World Alzheimer Month this September Latest Figures Show Estimated 2,691 People Living with Dementia in Limerick Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie LimerickNewsO’Donovan welcomes major investment in LimerickBy Staff Reporter – August 31, 2020 244 Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Patrick O’Donovan said that with he would continue to work with Fine Gael Councillors across the County to identify work like this that the Council and the Government can complete, and that he would engage positively with the Council staff to advance projects for communities across Limerick. Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSKeeping Limerick PostlimerickLimerick Post Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League openerlast_img read more


June 4, 2021 0

Seasoned Female Executive to Speak at Network Ireland Limerick event

first_imgWhatsApp Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Advertisement SIOBHAN O’Shea, Client Services Director with CPL, will share lessons from her rich and varied career journey to date as guest speaker at Network Ireland Limerick’s February event.Businesswomen throughout the Mid West are welcome to attend the event which is being organised in conjunction with AIB Limerick on 17 February 2021.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A seasoned professional, frequent speaker and qualified Executive Coach, she will talk about exploring a career with meaning as well as resilience, leadership and striking more equality for women in the workplace.Siobhan started her career as an investment advisor on Wall Street and as a Producer for financial television network CNBC.  As well as being a director with CPL, she currently sits on a number of boards, is Vice President of the National Recruitment Federation and Chair of the Dublin Regional Skills Forum.Caragh O’Shea, president of Network Ireland Limerick, said, “We are delighted to have Siobhan O’Shea join us. She is a well-regarded speaker and has so many lessons to share from her vast experience – from creating a space at the boardroom table to finding a career with purpose to bridging the equality gap.“It promises to be an insightful evening and we hope it will inspire and fuel the ambition of our attendees whether they are a business owner, senior manager or an employee.” she said.Co-hosted with AIB, the event takes place on Wednesday 17 February at 7.30pm. It is free for Network Ireland Limerick members and only €20 for non-members. Tickets available on www.networkireland.ie or www.eventbrite.ie   or email [email protected] TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostNetwork Ireland Limerick Print BusinessLimerickNewsSeasoned Female Executive to Speak at Network Ireland Limerick eventBy Meghann Scully – February 1, 2021 161 Email Twitter Previous articleTomorrow’s Racing at Limerick Racecourse CancelledNext articleWATCH: Paul O’Connell on “challenging but fun” experience with the Irish team Meghann Scully center_img Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Facebook Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live last_img read more


June 4, 2021 0

New program seeks art for City Hall

first_img WhatsApp Pinterest By admin – May 1, 2018 Twitter Twitter Facebook The City of Odessa and a local arts nonprofit will begin taking submissions this week from artists under a new program that will showcase works in City Hall.The Cultural Arts Program Exhibition Series, approved recently by the Odessa City Council, will acquire pieces on a year-long loan and display them on the fifth floor of City Hall, where the elected officials meet. After the loan period, the city will have the option to buy one of the pieces per year using hotel/motel tax money, but so far city officials say any cost of the program will be minimal.Interim City Manager Michael Marrero said the city wants to build a collection of art owned by the city.“Our hope is that we just not have it at City Hall, but we have it on this floor, every other floor and every other building that the city owns, giving a forum for the artists here to display their art,” Marrero said.Marrero and the Odessa Council for the Arts and Humanities, which recently rebranded as Odessa Arts, modeled the program after one in Austin. The program follows a $500,000 renovation of City Hall approved last year that included remodeling City Council chambers on the fifth floor. The walls today are blank.“There’s a lot of space in City Hall to fill — There’s a lot of space to put art,” arts council Executive Director Randy Ham said. “…It’s going to be a really great way to showcase the talent we have right here in Odessa.”Anticipated submissions will include photography by Odessa College faculty members Beckwith Thompson and Steve Goff, who presented pictures of flowers during the City Council meeting last week.Works chosen for public display will be selected by a committee still being formed that will include Marrero, Ham and other city officials. Ham said the committee would consider two-dimensional art first, with sculptures likely too cumbersome for City Hall’s fifth floor. The city will accept submissions for six weeks via the website publicartist.org, Ham said.“People can go into City Hall and say ‘Hey, that’s my granddaughter’s painting’ or ‘That’s my friend’s’, and it’s better to be able to say something like that versus ‘This a great picture, we know the name, but we don’t know who they are,” District 5 City Councilman Filiberto Gonzales said. “If it’s somebody that was raised here or that lives here and they give back to the community, why not do the same thing for them.”Odessa College photography faculty members Beckwith Thompson and Steve Goff showed Odessa City Council members two pieces they plan to submit for a new program that will showcase works of local artists at City Hall.Photos Courtesy of Beckwith Thompson and Steve GoffMore Information Odessa Council for the Arts and Humanities.center_img WhatsApp Local NewsGovernment New program seeks art for City Hall Facebook Pinterest Previous articleFire marshal says career was rewardingNext articleFive things you need to know today, May 1 adminlast_img read more


June 2, 2021 0

Longtime UTPB lecturer wears many hats

first_img Pinterest Previous articleECTOR COUNTY FELONY DISPOSITIONS May 14, 2018Next articleOil show organizers: ‘We’re back’ admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook UTPB Accounting.Texas State Board of Public Accountancy. University of Texas Permian Basin lecturer and Title IX coordinator Narita Holmes.  When Narita Holmes goes to work at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, she fills many roles.She’s a lecturer in accountancy in the College of Business, assistant compliance officer and Title IX coordinator. Holmes also was selected as the UTPB College of Business Outstanding Teacher for 2017-2018.With an extensive background in accounting, working at financial institutions and banking, Holmes started at UTPB as an adjunct professor in 1999. She began working there full time in 2004.A native Odessan, Holmes graduated from Odessa High School, went to Odessa College and the University of Texas at Austin. WhatsApp Local NewsEducation Longtime UTPB lecturer wears many hats University of Texas Permian Basin lecturer and Title IX coordinator Narita Holmes.  Registration set for engineering camp OCA top 2 were ESL students Slap Your Mama It’s So Delicious Southern Squash CasseroleCreamy Fruit SaladFruit Salad to Die ForPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay Twitter Twitter Pinterest By admin – May 14, 2018 She has a degree in accounting from UT Austin and a master’s in business administration with a concentration in accounting from UTPB.Starting off as an internal auditor and assistant compliance officer, Holmes also was doing a variety of as requested projects.“I was working pretty long days, so the president and I agreed that at that point in time I would teach just one class. Then later on, a lecturer position came open that was more directed toward teaching. I gave up the internal audit position and took the lecturer position in accounting. I really have a passion for the students. I love the students,” she said.Her classes are face-to-face and online.“When I first started teaching, all classes were face to face. As we were growing and as the demand increased for online classes, I started working to convert some of the classes that I teach to online. I just love both. I like the interaction in the face-to-face classes and we have students who learn better face-to-face,” Holmes said.Accounting works better face-to-face sometimes just to make sure the student is absorbing the information, she said. Online is eight weeks and face-to-face is 13 weeks, but it depends on the student as to which option they choose.Many students take accounting internships toward the end of their bachelor’s and master’s degrees.“When they’re doing an internship, sometimes an online class works well. Spring is when a lot of the internships come up because of tax season,” Holmes said.Students often log more than 40 hours a week for their internships at CPA firms, so an online class can allow them to finish their degree, while still interning.“The great thing about the internships is that they get class credit for it. They get very often a job offer — a permanent job offer — out of internships. They definitely get good experience to put on their resumes, so it’s a great opportunity for them,” Holmes said.She had 13 interns in the spring semester — the most she’s ever had.“They’re actually spread around a little bit. They can do their internship wherever they live, or wherever they get the job,” Holmes said.“In accounting, we only allow paid internships because our students are providing work just like employees. They do get paid in many instances very nice salaries for doing the work. The internship requires at least 150 hours of work during the semester to get credit for it and to qualify to count as a class for the state board of public accountancy,” she added.When the internship is over, students are required to write a paper and they get an evaluation from the employers, just like at a regular job.“We get feedback on the performance of the students and how they’ve done on the job. They’re required throughout their internship to keep a detailed log of the work that they do and the time they spend on it, so that we can demonstrate to the (Texas) State Board of Public Accountancy that they have done appropriate work to qualify for a class and that they have completed the hours so the log gets rather long with all the work that they do,” Holmes said.She noted there is also a master’s in professional accountancy, which is a graduate program specific to accounting, and students who need to complete the rest of the requirements to sit for the CPA exam.“There are very stringent requirements for the state board of accountancy, so part of our advising is to work with our students and not only to make certain they are meeting all the degree requirements, but all the requirements to sit for the CPA exam, if they’re interested in becoming a CPA, which most of them are,” Holmes said.She added that in Texas, and she suspects nationwide, the number of “gray-haired” certified public accountants planning to retire in the next 10 years is more than half of the membership of the state society of CPAs.“So there will be numerous jobs available from those retiring, but there are also many, many jobs being created because of the economy,” Holmes said.She added that there are some “really great students” in the program.“Employers tell us we aren’t turning them out fast enough for all the positions available right now. Our students pretty much have full employment the moment they graduate,” Holmes said.Allison Eyler is working toward sitting for the CPA exam and often sings Holmes’ praises to her family, even though they think she works Eyler too hard.Eyler said Holmes is able to teach from a wealth of experience, so students like her are able to apply what they’ve learned in real time.“She puts her whole heart and soul into teaching,” Eyler said.Eyler, who previously worked in accounting at Southwest Airlines, is currently helping to develop an internal auditing program for the Diocese of San Angelo and really enjoys it. She added that she will be with the Diocese through the summer and hopes to continue there.“It’s really fun and something I never thought I would do,” she said.Victoria Salazar, another of Holmes’ students, got a job offer from a Midland accounting firm out of the internship she did for it.“I believe that Ms. Holmes is a great professor. She is always there to help students and she has helped me since I started my accounting degree two years ago. She is a great motivator and she knows what direction, or path, to put students on to achieve their goals in the accounting profession,” Salazar said in an email.“There are many reasons why Ms. Holmes is amazing, but the biggest thing that popped out when I first met her is that she has a big heart and she will do whatever it takes for her students to enjoy accounting and achieve their goal in graduating from college with an accounting degree. If any student in accounting was having trouble in class or work, she would be the go to person to answer any questions that need to be answered. I wouldn’t be graduating and walking the stage without her help throughout my college career,” she added.Holmes also deals with compliance training, conflicts of interest and Title IX training related to sexual harassment and sexual assault.“We actually have a training platform where we keep all our different modules of all our different topics. I get a regular report that tells me key information about new employees that are being signed up, so I can get them enrolled them into those training courses because they’re required to be completed ASAP,” Holmes said.Child protection training is required for campus, as well, and UTPB offers several during the summer.“The UT System developed a model training that all of us could use and they went to the state and got approval. You have to complete child protection training to work at the camp, whether it’s athletic (or) academic. If it’s strictly college students and (they’re) all above 18, that’s not an issue. But with younger students, state law is they have to have training,” she said.More Information WhatsApp University of Texas Permian Basin lecturer and Title IX coordinator Narita Holmes.  1 of 2 Facebook Noel earns award Home Local News Education Longtime UTPB lecturer wears many hatslast_img read more


June 2, 2021 0

Carisk® and HandsFree Health™ Provide HIPAA Compliant Voice-Enabled Digital Health Assistant and Smart Home…

first_img WhatsApp By Digital AIM Web Support – February 4, 2021 Pinterest Twitter Local NewsBusiness Pinterest WhatsApp Facebookcenter_img Previous articleAmeriprise Financial Included in the Bloomberg Gender-Equality Index for the Second Consecutive YearNext articleZayo Group and Colony Capital to Deliver Inaugural Keynote at the Capacity Media Virtual Metro Connect USA 2021 Digital AIM Web Support Carisk® and HandsFree Health™ Provide HIPAA Compliant Voice-Enabled Digital Health Assistant and Smart Home Technology Solution in Workers’ Compensation: Improves Quality of Life and Patient Engagement MIAMI–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 4, 2021– Carisk Partners (Carisk), a specialty risk transfer and care coordination company and HandsFree Health™ (Wayne, PA), provider of WellBe®, collaborate to deliver a HIPAA compliant, voice-enabled, home health assistant as an essential component of Carisk’s Pathways 2 Recovery™ next generation integrated technology solutions for catastrophically injured patients. This relationship advances Carisk’s Patient-Centered capabilities in its evolved Workers’ Compensation 2.0 model. This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210204005704/en/ “Keeping patients motivated and fully engaged in their recovery process can be one of the most important aspects of an integrated treatment approach,” says Alana Letourneau, MD, MBA, Chief Clinical Strategy Officer, Carisk Partners. “The WellBe voice-activated digital assistant fosters independence and empowerment in patients with severe mobility impairments from the comfort of their homes.” HandsFree Health is the creator of WellBe, the premier voice enabled virtual health assistant platform. WellBe was designed to help people access their health and wellness resources in the easiest way possible, by using their voice. Led by a team of former healthcare executives with over 150 years of experience, HandsFree Health has quickly become the benchmark for voice technology in healthcare. The technology will allow patients to contact their care team or access emergency services in a hands-free environment. “We are thrilled to partner with Carisk in delivering essential healthcare technology solutions to improve patient interactions that aid in recovery. We think this program highlights the need for advanced in-home health technologies like WellBe,” says Mike Cardillo, Founder, CEO HandsFree Health. WellBe’s features include medication and appointment reminders, and access to a health database ensuring patients, families and caregivers get answers to their medical questions from reliable, evidence-based sources. The device is HIPAA compliant for patient privacy and confidentiality. With smart-phone integration, it complements the technology offerings provided though the existing Carisk mobile health application and allows Carisk clinicians to connect patients with resources and support tailored to each individual’s biopsychosocial needs. The system enables and manages smart home devices allowing patients to control key aspects of their home such as lightbulbs, and small appliances through voice activation. “Driving the utilization of assistive technologies that make the delivery of personal care services cost-effective and efficient is core to our strategy,” says Joseph Berardo, Jr., CEO, Carisk Partners. “When Mike approached us with this solution, we immediately knew this would improve accessibility, quality of care, compliance and ultimately quality of life in catastrophically injured patients. We look forward to our continued partnership with HandsFree Health and seeing how the WellBe capabilities continue to develop.” Carisk plans to launch the WellBe device in February 2021 in a pilot program for catastrophically injured patients with upper extremity injuries and limited function. About Carisk Partners Carisk is a specialty risk transfer, care coordination company serving insurers, government entities, self-insured plan sponsors and other managed care organizations. With a foundation in behavioral health, Carisk’s end-to-end combined solutions include risk-transfer and care coordination of delayed recovery, complex catastrophic cases and MBHO services. Carisk’s Pathways 2 Recovery program guarantees to improve outcomes and reduce overall cost of quality care by applying best practices and a patient-centered approach to manage complex challenges for the Group Health, Casualty and Auto markets. Carisk is the first and only Managed Behavioral Healthcare Organization with dual accreditations from both the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Healthcare, Inc. (AAAHC). Visit www.cariskpartners.com to learn more. About HandsFree Health™ HandsFree Health™ offers a suite of products for consumers and businesses to move individuals closer to compliance and optimal health. HandsFree Health makes intelligently designed, fully integrated health and wellness platforms. HandsFree Health has quickly become the benchmark for voice technology in healthcare. HandsFree Health is the creator of WellBe®, the premier voice enabled virtual health AI assistant platform. WellBe is a secure voice-activated assistant, built on a trusted, HIPAA compliant platform. Products are sold online at HandsFree Health, as well as other online retailers Walmart.com, Amazon.com, and Newegg.com. View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210204005704/en/ CONTACT: Christine Gaul Carisk Partners [email protected] KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA FLORIDA PENNSYLVANIA INDUSTRY KEYWORD: TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL DEVICES HUMAN RESOURCES OTHER TECHNOLOGY PROFESSIONAL SERVICES SOFTWARE AUDIO/VIDEO HARDWARE MANAGED CARE HEALTH SOURCE: Carisk Partners Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/04/2021 09:00 AM/DISC: 02/04/2021 09:01 AM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210204005704/en Twitter Facebook TAGS  last_img read more


June 2, 2021 0

Cheney says she won’t quit the House after Wyoming censure

first_imgLocal NewsUS News Cheney says she won’t quit the House after Wyoming censure Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp TAGS  Pinterest Twitter Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 7, 2021 Previous articleThe Latest: Pope greets public again with wide distancingNext articleJuhasz, Patty lead No. 11 Buckeye women past Gophers 83-59 Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more


June 2, 2021 0

What’s safe after COVID-19 vaccination? Don’t shed masks yet

first_img Previous articleOilers beat Flames 2-1 to open home-and-home seriesNext articleRaptors score last 11 to defeat Timberwolves 86-81 Digital AIM Web Support By Digital AIM Web Support – February 20, 2021 Local NewsUS News Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Facebook FILE – In this Feb. 19, 2021, file photo, people wait in line at a 24-hour, walk-up COVID-19 vaccination clinic hosted by the Black Doctors COVID-19 Consortium at Temple University’s Liacouras Center in Philadelphia. At least for now, U.S. health authorities say after being vaccinated, people should follow the same rules as everybody else about wearing a mask, keeping a 6-foot distance and avoiding crowds even after they’ve gotten their second vaccine dose.center_img TAGS  Twitter Pinterest What’s safe after COVID-19 vaccination? Don’t shed masks yet Pinterest WhatsApplast_img read more


June 2, 2021 0