Category: bksuroys

California Supreme Court upholds ruling in San Joaquin property case

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA July 18, 2016 at 1:20 pm I am active in my local Episcopal Church. I’m not leaving. This issue of “breakaways” hits home with me because it has partly involved friends who were pillars in our church. They were the constants, the old reliables, loyal, a family whose ancestors founded the church, a family with an Episcopal missionary among them, educated, world-traveled — and these and others felt betrayed by a Church that they felt had “left us”. They could recount with anguish a Church that they felt was out of control and not living in honesty with its own standards: notable bishops and other clergy who denied the Resurrection, others who openly denied that Christ is the unique and sufficient Incarnation of God (never equal to others and surpassing all others), clergy who denied that Christ invites the world to salvation through His works alone, winking at canonical standards, bishops flatly ignoring canons to pursue a personal revelation agenda in “their” diocese, disregard for restraints asked for by the larger Communion, and flat rejection of Communion-wide agreements on sensitive matters of sexuality. One bishop very famously denied that there were same gender weddings in his diocese (in order to get to go to Lambeth) when the reverse was proven. Such canonical disobedience was called “prophetic”. When the dissenters – like our friends – took their actions to distance themselves it was called “disloyalty”. Odd how that gets to be viewed that way. Time and General Convention has revealed that there is little room for dissent on issues that were formerly promoted as “all may — none must”. Many of the so-called “breakaways” were formerly praised as some of the most vital — soon they were villainized when they wanted to get away from all of this and just go with the stuff that they or their ancestors had bought and paid for and paid dearly to maintain. They became mocked as “just a few who don’t want to be with….us”. So, thirteen years later there have been thousands of our members lost to another emerging Anglican presence in this country. At least 5 dioceses left and in their wake there are mainly untenable remnants left which require great resources to maintain. Meanwhile our Sunday attendance, baptisms, and Sunday Schools are burying deeper into the negative. Cathedrals have closed. Seminaries have shuttered. People are staying away. Pockets of vitality are truly few.Any organization under such stress and decline would self-examine in painfully honest ways. So….some property has been gained back. And it will be empty. It will be costly to maintain. The larger Church will continue to underwrite the costs of struggling “continuing Episcopal dioceses”.If there is a “win”, then it is microscopic. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Property The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Leslie G Marshall says: Rector Tampa, FL F William Thewalt says: July 16, 2016 at 4:59 pm There is no winner in this matter. Ideologues from both sides have done tremendous damage to the Anglican people of the San Joaquin Valley. Christina Cleveland says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rev. Julian Hills says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing July 18, 2016 at 4:58 pm Remember, Our Lord works and speaks to us in very mysterious ways and if this was not the will of our Lord, it would not be. It is our challenge to pray and learn his true motive and message. I can’t help but believe it has a great deal to do with “Love thy neighbor as thyself.” July 22, 2016 at 8:31 am No…in a nutshell I described the reality of people being tagged “breakaways”. They have faces, histories of loyalty, and they bring a conversation that few want to hear. They can trace with clarity “the club’s” changing of its own standards when it suited, failure to discipline errant leaders when convenient, and the “club’s” increasing intolerance of anyone who didn’t go along with those things quietly. Curate Diocese of Nebraska July 27, 2016 at 3:46 pm Doug… yours is the most compelling explanation of all, as to what happened to those that had The Church crumble around their ears. The same thing happened at my Church. All those outre beliefs were present, PLUS we were also given Islamic readings to ponder, and meditate on (at the same time, blasting the Bible, over & over again.) Since I had been educating myself with the bible (with no help from TEC), I knew what to do. I just went to a plain Christian church –where the pastor was not ashamed of Jesus. God is good! Yet, 13 years later, I’m still heart-broken, to see a once-beautiful Church body, be so adulterous. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 30, 2016 at 7:14 pm You are right that many conservatives were underserved in the church but to leave and not fight on did everyone a great disservice. We should all pray fro forgiveness. [Episcopal News Service] The California Supreme Court on July 13 “declined to review” a decision made in April by a state appellate court putting an end to eight years of litigation and awarding 28 properties worth an estimated $50 million to the continuing Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.“Accordingly, the original judgment in favor of the Diocese and ordering the return of the properties and funds (approximately twenty-eight properties, including ECCO and the Cathedral, and various Diocesan funds) stands,” said Michael Glass, diocesan chancellor, in a July 14 statement to the diocese.“It is my belief that the leadership of the Anglican Diocese intends to work with the Diocese to provide for an orderly, thoughtful, and pastoral transition of the properties,” he added.Three remaining parish cases, St. John’s in Porterville, St. Paul’s in Visalia and St. Columba in Fresno, will now resume, said Glass in the statement.In describing the situation, San Joaquin Bishop David Rice made an analogy to air travel. “…It has been an extraordinarily long flight, suffice it to say, the flight was challenging, sometimes turbulent, and certainly at times less than comfortable.  And I trust the thought occurred to all those on board once-or-twice, will this thing ever land?  Landed it has.  We are on the runway and the tarmac upon which we find ourselves is unfamiliar to us, that’s what eight years will do.  And if you allow me to continue with the image for a moment longer; we are sitting on the tarmac and the attendant has indicated that the seatbelt sign is still on,” he said.“Faithful ones of the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, this is the most important point I wish to convey. The seatbelt sign remains illuminated. It is not time yet to get up and empty the compartments overhead, nor is it time to deplane.  We need to sit a bit longer.  And patient we have been, particularly those who have been waiting for eight long years, what a flight eh!  But sit a bit longer we must.”He then reiterated a position he’s long held to.“I have suggested in the past that we assume a position of prayerful restraint,” said Rice. “There will be an appropriate time and place for celebration.  What we do now, which is what we are always called to do, is to give thanks to God that we are Called to be… And the ways in which we continue to emerge in this Jesus Movement remains our focus.”In December 2007 a majority of the diocese’s congregations voted to realign with the Argentina-based Anglican Province of the Southern Cone, taking properties belonging to the church with them. In a statement on its website, the bishop of the Anglican Diocese of San Joaquin said the diocese would comply with the July 13 ruling.Earlier this year, the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin and the Episcopal Church received a decision April 5 from the Fifth District Court of Appeal affirming the judgment issued in 2014 by Fresno Superior Court that ruled that the breakaway Anglican diocese had no legal right to the property, including St. James Cathedral Fresno, the Evergreen Conference Center in Oakhurst and various other properties belonging to the diocese.Property disputes between the Episcopal Church and other breakaway groups in Fort Worth and South Carolina are ongoing. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC George J Wade says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 21, 2016 at 6:19 pm So in a nutshell, you feel it is alright to quit the club if you disagree with the direction the club is going and take the clubhouse with you? I should think not! Susan W. Morrison says: Doug Desper says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Pamela Kruse-Buckingham says: July 18, 2016 at 6:46 pm The courts in South Carolina and Texas ruled for the conservative breakaway dioceses. Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab jim davis says: Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls California Supreme Court upholds ruling in San Joaquin property case Decision signals an end to eight years of litigation July 30, 2016 at 7:10 pm As a conservative I would agree with you Doug but there was much uncanonical moves on the other side of the divide as well and much I read was tinted with bigotry. I remain in the loyal opposition in my church and with logic and love pesevere through many a peversity. Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By ENS staffPosted Jul 14, 2016 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Terry Francis says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 20, 2016 at 4:27 pm In a July 13 letter to the Anglican diocese, their bishop stated:“Now is the time for us to begin the process of handing over the properties. We will work with TEC to do this in as gracious and orderly a manner as possible.”May we Episcopalians also exhibit grace – and mercy, too – starting with gifting the Anglican diocese properties that do not have adequate Episcopal congregations waiting to fill them.Yes, I realize that eight years ago the Anglican diocese did not exhibit grace and mercy toward continuing Episcopalians, causing tremendous grief and distress for many people, and to this day, they continue to treat gays like lepers. However, if you’re thinking of doing unto them what they did unto us, you definitely need to do some immediate remedial gospel reading. No prayer or “discernment” needed here! Rector Collierville, TN jim davis says: July 24, 2016 at 8:17 pm I totally agree with Doug Desper regarding this issue. The reason so many of these dioceses broke away is because sharing and spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ had taken a distance back seat to leftward-leaning political activism in TEC. The notion that different points of view are welcome in this church was and is quite simply, a shame. If you express the view for instance, that we should take control of our borders in regards to immigration, you’re a racist. If you express the belief that same-sex marriages go against Biblical teaching you’re a hate-filled closed-minded intolerant homophobic bigot. Is it any wonder so many chose to leave! So to the Diocese of San Joaquin I say rejoice in your hard-won “victory” and the retaining of your precious property. So what if many conservative and traditional Episcopalians are now left out in the cold! I hope it was worth it. Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA July 17, 2016 at 8:51 pm Time and again the courts have found in favor of the established Episcopal Church and against the breakaway groups, We must have a clear legal case to ownership of Diocesan property. It also seems like plain common sense that a Diocese has a continuing interest in the property it owns, When will these breakaway groups realize there is no free lunch, especially one gained by stealing. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 20, 2016 at 7:55 pm There are Episcopalians that were left out in the cold when all this happened. We have a parishioner that moved from Alameda to Tracy to live near family due to health reasons, and there is no Episcopal Priest to go and visit her. So sad. It’s a very long trip for one of our Priests or LEM’s to get all the way to Tracy to give communion. I pray for the healing of the Church in the Jan Joaquin Valley, and I pray that some Priests get out there soon. Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 18, 2016 at 10:18 am The word “continuing” in paragraph 1 is surely misleading, since that word has been used by Anglican but non-Episcopal Church groups — including “breakaways” referred to later in the article. I had to click on the diocesan link to be sure I knew which “diocese” was being referred to, and recommend that the editor revise that sentence. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Doug Desper says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments (14) PJ Cabbiness says: Brian A. MacFarland says: last_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

After building an inviting new parish hall, an Ohio church…

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA By Egan MillardPosted Jun 6, 2019 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York After building an inviting new parish hall, an Ohio church asks the community to make it their own Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN The completed campus of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Lakewood, Ohio. Photo: Barrett T. Newman/St. Peter’s Episcopal Church[Episcopal News Service] If you’d walked by the corner of Detroit Avenue and West Clifton Boulevard in downtown Lakewood, Ohio, a year ago, you would have seen an impressive but imposing neo-Gothic church attached to a drab brick building with air conditioners sprouting from rusted window frames. It might’ve been hard to tell whether anything was happening at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, with its fortress-like stone walls and dark wooden doors. Though its stained-glass windows are dazzling from the inside, you would have seen nothing but opaque black glass.Walk past the same corner in this cheerful Cleveland suburb today and you’ll see the same church, but the adjoining building has been replaced by a modern addition that curves out toward the street. Through its floor-to-ceiling glass windows, you might see a choir rehearsal, a Bible study, a piano recital, or even a yoga class. As striking as the new building is, your eye would be drawn to the people inside.That transformation is the basis for a new mission at St. Peter’s. What started as a project to rebuild the aging parish hall became an opportunity to make the parish more accessible and invite the larger community in. Rather than limiting the new building to church-related usage and income-generating space rentals, St. Peter’s is inviting its neighbors to approach the building with their own ideas – and on their own terms.“The whole building is designed to invite people in,” said the Rev. Keith Owen II, rector of St. Peter’s. “And we’re basically saying to the community, ‘Come and look at this building and help us imagine what we can do in here.’”The $3.5 million project originated a decade ago, when parish leaders realized that the 1950s parish hall – which housed the parish offices, several classrooms and the church’s long-running day care center – had reached the end of its useful life and was beyond repair.“The old building was obsolete, falling down and inhospitable,” Owen told Episcopal News Service. “It was hopelessly out of compliance with all current building codes. If we even tried to rehabilitate any part of that building, all of the current building codes would have come into effect, which would have effectively shut down our day care center.”And the building was a nightmare for elderly or handicapped parishioners.“If you were mobility-impaired, it was flat-out impossible for you to meet with the rector in his office. You just couldn’t get there. There were eight or nine different levels” between the church and the parish hall, said parishioner Fred Purdy.“So, for all those reasons, we decided we needed to do a complete tear-down and build a new one,” Owen said.The new building solves the access problems with an elevator and a hallway that gently slopes from the entrance up to the narthex, where it connects to the church without any steps. But it presented an opportunity to make the parish more accessible in other ways, too. As beautiful as the 1920s church building is, you can’t see in or out. The old parish hall suffered from similar visibility issues.“The building could be full of people and, from the outside, you’d never know it,” said Owen.“We wanted to make sure the community could see in,” echoed parishioner Lorna Jordan. “Nobody knows what’s going on inside.”The architectural solution, of course, was glass – so much glass that Owen is convening a “Squeegee Squad” of parish volunteers to clean it all on a regular basis. From the parish offices to the lounge to the day care center, the building is flooded with natural light. A courtyard with a small prayer garden sits in the center of the new church complex. But the focal point of the project is the section closest to the street: a multipurpose space called the Chapel of the Confession of St. Peter.To highlight its flexibility, the chapel is decidedly minimalist, with plain white walls, large windows and no fixed pews. There will be one major decorative element, though: a specially commissioned icon of the biblical scene the chapel is named for, in which Jesus asks his apostles who they believe he is, and Peter replies that he is the son of God.The chapel will be used for smaller services, choir practices and parish group meetings, but it also represents a new outreach opportunity for the church. Along with the other mission projects that currently operate on the property – such as the affordable day care center and a free meal program – this multipurpose space is intended as a gift to the community, an open invitation to the people of Lakewood to decide how they want to use it.“Our function as a parish truly resides in the community at large,” said Purdy. “It’s our intention that it be utilized as the community finds to its benefit.”“We’re kind of putting our feelers out in the community,” said Jordan. The parish will celebrate the grand opening of the new building on Sunday, June 9, with Lakewood’s mayor and the bishop of Ohio in attendance, and Jordan hopes that will encourage people to reach out with their ideas for how to use the space.Potential uses suggested by Owen and parishioners include concerts, crafting, tai chi, dance classes, town hall meetings, lectures, meals, art shows, and an emergency homeless shelter on dangerously cold winter nights. Currently, there are no plans to charge rental fees for nonprofit events. Owen said the parish has offered the space to Beck Center for the Arts – a performing arts theater two blocks away – as it undergoes a building project of its own.Owen explained, “We basically said to them, ‘Here’s this beautiful, acoustically alive room, and you’re getting ready to tear your building down and rebuild it, so use it! Here it is! Use it!’ And they were kind of like, ‘What? Really? For free?’ And we said, ‘Yeah, for free!’”Whatever activities the community brings to the new space in the years to come, the project has already changed the dynamic between the parish and the surrounding neighborhood. With so much glass, it feels like the space doesn’t really have walls at all. The distinction between inside and outside – or secular and religious – seems to fade.“Now, nothing can go on in that building that cannot be seen from outside,” Owen said. “People can see in and we see out, so there’s a kind of communication going on between the community and the congregation that never went on before.”And if you happen to walk past at a time when there are no events in the building, there will still be something inside the new chapel that catches your eye: that one-of-a-kind icon. At five feet by four feet, it will be “unavoidably visible from the street,” said Owen, who spoke to ENS while driving back to Ohio after picking up the icon in Florida.“[That was] something we didn’t really plan,” he said. “It just kind of happened.“And it asks the question of us at St. Peter’s and it asks the question of people stopped at the stoplight at the intersection of Detroit and West Clifton and people walking by on the sidewalk, ‘Who do you say that I am?’”– Egan Millard is a freelance reporter based in the Boston area and a member of the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Massachusetts. Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more


June 20, 2021 0

TCU implements new safety requirements in syllabi

first_imgTwitter Twitter ReddIt TCU receives 100 more COVID-19 vaccines World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Drew Mitchellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/drew-mitchell/ Drew Mitchell Facebook ReddIt Landing zones to remain on campus for spring semester Linkedin Drew Mitchellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/drew-mitchell/ Linkedin A diagram of the rally points incase of an emergency Timeka Gordon influences America’s future leaders Drew Mitchellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/drew-mitchell/ TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Drew Mitchell is a Journalism major with an African American Studies Minor from Arlington, Texas. He has worked on staff for TCU 360 since his freshman year and is currently the Executive Editor of the Skiff, where they design and print a weekly paper for the TCU community. Facebook Previous articleCity proposes price increase for golf yearly passesNext articleSoccer survives late Ohio State comeback effort, wins 3-2 Drew Mitchell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR + posts Drew Mitchellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/drew-mitchell/ printA diagram of the rally points in case of an emergency. Diagram provided by Adrian Andrews In the wake of recent mass shootings and other threats to safety, TCU is taking precautions to ensure students and staff are prepared if an emergency occurs. Over the past year and a half, TCU’s police department launched a campaign that teaches how to respond during a lockdown, evacuation or “seek shelter” situation. The program, titled “L.E.S.S. is More,” an acronym that stands for “lockdown, evacuation or seek shelter,” functions as emergency responses needed to reduce damages and, more importantly, save lives. The TCU police department is now requiring professors to include the safety protocols in their syllabi, according to Assistant Vice Chancellor for Public Safety Adrian Andrews. “It is very important that we look at safety as a team sport,” Andrews said. “Everybody knows the police are going to try to keep everyone safe, but we ask that our students, our staff and faculty also contribute in making us safe as well.”Dr. Jeanelle Hope, assistant professor of comparative race and ethnic studies, said she wasn’t aware of the requirement, but after taking a syllabus workshop during the summer she realized the importance of including the safety protocol. “I think it’s fine,” Hope said. “A big concern that faculty often have, and that came in discussion during our Koehler Center workshop, is the size of a syllabus can get pretty lengthy.”Despite the length, Hope said emergency preparedness is something all students should know about. Andrews said he is not concerned with the length of the syllabi. Professor of environmental sciences Kristen Argenbright said she also wasn’t aware of the requirement. “It’s brand new [so] it’s going to take some training to let people know what’s going on,” Argenbright said. “It’s just that a lot of folks don’t know about the ‘L.E.S.S. is More’ program.”In hopes of spreading awareness, the TCU Department of Public Safety created a pamphlet and diagram that shows “rally points” in case of an emergency. It also includes instructions on how to handle situations when a person’s safety is at risk. “The syllabus makes the faculty responsible,” Andrews said. “They have to actually think about those young people who are sitting in front of them. They are responsible for their safety as well.” The Office of Religious & Spiritual Life to host eighth annual Crossroads Lecture Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more


June 13, 2021 0

Threats against journalists a few days before election

first_img April 22, 2015 Find out more May 29, 2015 Find out more News Journalists repeatedly attacked in Macedonian political crisis Sinister threat to Macedonian journalist and his family News Reporters Without Borders protested today against legal action taken by Macedonian interior minister Ljube Boskovski against a journalist who wrote that the government was planning to put off elections next week in a bid to stay in power. The minister has also warned he would take action against other journalists.”It is unacceptable that journalists are the target of legal action when they are simply doing their job,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard in a letter to Macedonian prime minister Ljubco Georgievski. “We ask that your government drop this action immediately and that your ministers, notably Mr Boskovski, end their intimidation campaign against the independent press.”Marjan Djurovski, of the weekly Start, is being prosecuted after publishing an article on 6 September saying the country’s coalition government was planning to set off a war so it could postpone elections set for 15 September which opinion polls say it has little chance of winning.Since 30 August, the foreign and interior ministers have publicly accused journalists and diplomats of plotting to destabilise the government. Minister Boskovski has warned that he will take all necessary steps to end this alleged conspiracy.The government has been stirring up political and ethnic tension in recent weeks, increasing pressure on the independent media and displaying intolerance of any kind of criticism. Outspoken columnist threatened, his car torched Receive email alerts Follow the news on North Macedonia Organisation center_img September 9, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Threats against journalists a few days before election North MacedoniaEurope – Central Asia March 8, 2017 Find out more to go further Help by sharing this information News RSF_en News North MacedoniaEurope – Central Asia last_img read more


June 12, 2021 0

Promotion Of Candidate Will Take Effect From Date Of Eligibility And Not Date On Interview: Delhi High Court

first_imgNews UpdatesPromotion Of Candidate Will Take Effect From Date Of Eligibility And Not Date On Interview: Delhi High Court Radhika Roy9 March 2021 9:49 AMShare This – xThe Delhi High Court on Monday held that the promotion of a candidate would take effect from date of eligibility and not from the date of interview as per the Career Advancement Scheme (CAS) governed by the UGC Regulations.The prayer in the three petitions, filed on behalf of Dr. Kiran Gupta, Prof. PB Pankaja and Manju Arora Relan, sought for the promotion to the post of Professor from…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Delhi High Court on Monday held that the promotion of a candidate would take effect from date of eligibility and not from the date of interview as per the Career Advancement Scheme (CAS) governed by the UGC Regulations.The prayer in the three petitions, filed on behalf of Dr. Kiran Gupta, Prof. PB Pankaja and Manju Arora Relan, sought for the promotion to the post of Professor from the post of Associate Professor with effect from the date of eligibility and not from the date of interview at Faculty of Law, Delhi University. It was held by a Single-Judge Bench of Justice V. Kameswar Rao that there was a clear demonstration of prejudice against the Petitioners, and held that their promotion would relate back to their date of eligibility. The Court noted that there was no dispute the case of the Petitioners had to be considered under Career Advancement Scheme (CAS) 2010, with the selection procedure being stipulated under sub-clause 6.3.12. “From perusal of clause 6.3.12 sub-clause (a), it is clear that if a candidate applies for promotion on completion of the minimum eligibility period and is successful, the date of promotion will be from the date of minimum period of eligibility”. Consequently, the Court recorded that the Petitioners had been assessed fit for promotion, and accordingly, the promotion had to relate back to the date of minimum period of eligibility. The Court further noted that while sub-clause (c) contemplated that if a candidate did not succeed in the first assessment, but succeeded in the later assessment, his/her promotion would be deemed to be from the later date of successful assessment. However, in the instant case, there existed no conclusion of the Selection Committee that the Petitioenrs had not been found fit from the date of their eligibility. “Rather, it is seen that the Petitioners have been found fit on their first assessment itself for promotion to the post of Professor. If that be so, the Petitioners could not have been denied the promotion from the date of eligibility when the promotion with prospective effect is based on the same material”. Justice Rao also rejected the contention of the Respondent, who had placed reliance on the case of National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences that it was not necessary for the Selection Committee to give reasons for its conclusion, and stated that the Apex Court had given that finding in cases where rules did not contemplate for such reasoning. “But, in view of reading of the relevant Regulations, which I have already referred to above, surely there must be some expression of the fact/reason in case a teacher is not found fit in a particular year but found fit in a later year”. In light of the above, the Court set aside the proceedings of the Selection Committee and held that the promotion of the Petitioners would date back to their eligibilityClick Hear To Download/Read OrderSubscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more


May 26, 2021 0

Karnataka High Court Quashes Criminal Complaint Against AAI, Air India Executives Over Mangalore Flight Crash

first_imgNews UpdatesKarnataka High Court Quashes Criminal Complaint Against AAI, Air India Executives Over Mangalore Flight Crash Mustafa Plumber10 March 2021 6:38 AMShare This – xThe Karnataka High Court recently quashed the private complaint and the cognizance taken on it by a trial court at Managluru in 2013, against the Airports Authority of India (AAI), the Air India Ltd. (AI) and its executives in regards to the Air India Express 812 plane crash incident outside Mangaluru airport, on May 22, 2010, in which 158 persons on board were killed. A single bench…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Karnataka High Court recently quashed the private complaint and the cognizance taken on it by a trial court at Managluru in 2013, against the Airports Authority of India (AAI), the Air India Ltd. (AI) and its executives in regards to the Air India Express 812 plane crash incident outside Mangaluru airport, on May 22, 2010, in which 158 persons on board were killed. A single bench of Justice Ashok G. Nijagannavar passed the order while allowing the petitions filed in 2013 by AAI and its executive Ansbert D’Souza, and AI and its executive Peter Abraham, who challenged the cognisance taken by the magistrate court merely on the basis of “deemed sanction” for their prosecution. The court while quashing the complaint observed that said “Trial court has failed to consider the closure of the earlier chargesheet on the reason that the pilots who have been arraigned as accused have expired in the air crash and also the report of Court of Inquiry.” Case Background: An Air India Express flight crashed at Mangalore airport on May 22, 2010 killing 152 passengers and six crew members. The aircraft which was returning from Dubai (flight no IX-812) overran the runway and fell down the hill on the end of the runway. The judicial magistrate first class, on February 19, 2013, had taken cognisance for offences like culpable homicide not amounting to murder, causing death by negligence under Indian Penal Code against AAI, AI and their executives based on the private complaint lodged on March 6, 2012, by Mangaluru-based 812 Foundation, represented by its secretaries Nayana Pai and Yeshwant Shenoy. The complaint alleged that the accident was the direct consequence of gross and willful negligence on the part of Air India, AAI and the DGCA. The death of the 158 passengers was due to the failure of the officers to perform otherwise mandated by statute. The accused were duty bound to maintain the airport in accordance with ICAO standards and the accused were duty bound to ensure that no license is issued to those airports which do not meet ICAO norms. Further, it was claimed that there was no firing fighting system at the airport, there was no preparedness as per ICAO norms. There was no arrangement for carrying out rescue operations in the event of an air crash. There were no suitable rescue equipment and services at the airport. The air carrier has failed to conduct the proper risk assessments of the airport and take appropriate action to eliminate or mitigate the approach and landing accent reduction procedure. Submission of the petitioner: Senior Advocates Gurudas S Kannur and Uday Holla appearing for the petitioners submitted that the trial court could not have taken cognizance of the complaint without the sanction of under section 197 of CrPC. The trial court erred in interpreting the judgments of the apex court in the case of Subramanain Swamy and Vineet Narain. It was also submitted that the trial court failed to take into consideration the court of inquiry report submitted by the committee headed by experts who after holding a public enquiry and examining nearly 100 witnesses. Further it was said that it is a malafide complaint filed with an intention to harass the petitioners. The sanction under section 156 (3) CrPC is a must for investigation without which the magistrate cannot even order investigation. Court findings: The court referring to the Apex court judgement in the case of Subramania Swamy noted: “The trial court based its decision on the case of the Supreme Court reported in (2012) 3 SCC 64 Subramanain Swamy. The said case relates to prosecution under Section 19 of the Prevention of Corruption Act wherein the Supreme Court has referred the guidelines framed by CVC regarding sanction.” It added in the present case the allegation is in respect of negligence and offence punishable under section 304A of IPC which has nothing to do with the Prevention of Corruption act. The bench also took into account that section 32 of the Airport Authority of India Act specifies that all officers and employees of Airport Authority of India (AAI) shall be deemed to be public servants within the meaning of section 21 of IPC. Further, section 33 of AAI act specifies that no suit prosecution or any proceeding shall lie against the AAI or any member or any officer or any other employee of AAI for anything done in good faith or any damage sustained by any aircraft or vehicle in consequences of any defect in any airport, civil enclaves, heliports, airstrips, aeronautical communication station or other things belonging to or under the control of authority. Following which it said “In the present case the complainant himself had submitted the application for sanction to prosecute some of the accused persons but the said application was not submitted to the concerned authority as such there was some delay. Thereafter, the complainant- has approached the magistrate court for issuance of process on the pretext of deemed sanction, which is not tenable.” It added “The Magistrate court need not act as a sanctioning authority. Section 197 of CrPC does not provide for any deemed sanction. In the instant case the sanctioning authority has rejected the application of the complainant seeking sanction to prosecute the accused. The persons who are sought to be prosecuted are also government servants. Therefore, without sanction to prosecute the complainant was not at all maintainable. Since the sanction has been refused which has become final, the complaint is liable to be quashed.” Accordingly, the bench held “In view of the facts and circumstances of this case this court is of the view that order dated February 19, 2013 tasking cognizance and issuance of summons only on the ground of deemed sanction is not legal and justified.” The court then went through the Court of Inquiry and the charge sheet submitted by the police and said “Both in the opinion of the investigating and prosecuting agency and the learned judge, the person now named in the complaint had no role to play. The learned judge closed the case in terms of the report filed by the investigating agency and it was categorically stated that the error was of the pilot and co-pilot and since both of them were dead, no prosecution is possible against them. There was no allegation against the persons named in the complaint. All these facts have not been even considered by the magistrate while taking cognizance.” The bench concluded by saying “The trial court has failed to consider the closure of the earlier chargesheet on the reason that the pilots who have been arraigned as accused have expired in the air crash and also the report of court of inquiry. In view of the amended subsection (1) of section 202 of CrPC, it is obligatory upon the magistrate that before summoning the accused residing beyond his jurisdiction, he shall enquire into the case himself or direct investigation to be made by the police officer or by such other person for finding out whether or not there was sufficient ground for proceeding against the accused. In the case at hand no such attempt is done by the magistrate.”Click Hear To Download/Read OrderSubscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more


May 26, 2021 0

Troy University selected to host the ‘Big Read’

first_imgLatest Stories Email the author Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Troy University has received a grant to host The Big Read in Troy.“The Big Read” is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts, designed to revitalize the role of reading in the American culture by exposing citizens to great works of literature and encouraging them to read for pleasure and enrichment.Elaine Bassett, Troy University writing center coordinator, said Troy University is one of 77 nonprofit organizations to receive a grant to host a “Big Read” project and is the only location in Alabama to be funded. Published 3:00 am Saturday, September 6, 2014 Bassett said, not only will Troy University play an important role in encouraging reading but will also develop creative opportunities to involve all members of the Troy and Pike County communities to come together to discuss and celebrate great works of literature.“‘The Big Read’ answers a big need,” Bassett said. “A 2004 report by the NEA found that literary reading in America is declining among all age groups and that rate of decline is accelerating, especially among the young.’“The Big Read” supports organizations across the country in developing community-wide reading programs that encourage reading and participation by diverse audiences.Bassett said “The Big Read” in Troy will kick off on Sept. 16 and will offer opportunities to get together to read and share ideas. “The Big Read” will focus on “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury. Print Article By Blood Sugar Blaster By Jaine Treadwell Troy University selected to host the ‘Big Read’ Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Skip Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day “Troy University applied for ‘The Big Read’ grant program because we, as a university and as a community, value the importance of engaged reading in order to develop thoughtful, intelligent citizens of the community and the world,” Bassett said “We believe that reading opens the mind to new information, new ways of looking at situations, new discoveries – in other words, reading simply opens the mind.“We also believe in the free exchange of ideas and the discussion of ideas, even those that are challenging or controversial. Our hope is that some of our activities will engage both students and community members in conversation about ideas.”Although reading is usually a solitary activity, “The Big Read” will be a social event. Md: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) You Might Like Trojan Spirit: Covenant Christian (PHOTO GALLERY) Covenant Christian School students dressed up in their best Troy University outfits during Troy Spirit Day on Friday. 2nd and… read more Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Sponsored Content Bassett said “Fahrenheit 451” is a good book to kick off “The Big Read” because it deals with censorship and the banning of books.“‘Fahrenheit 451’ is a book about books and the ideas in those books,” she said. “We chose ‘Fahrenheit 451’ because it touches on the importance of being engaged in ideas and because it lets us see what the world would be if books and thoughts were illegal.In today’s world, many people of all ages, are tied to “technology” and have little time or energy for thoughtful engagement, Basset said.“By fostering open discussions of ‘Fahrenheit 45,’ we hope to help Troy unplug from technology and be a part of the conversation about books and ideas. We encourage those who enjoy reading and exchanging ideas to join us from 7 until 9 p.m. on Sept. 16 at the Johnson Center for the first ‘Big Read.’”“Fahrenheit 451” will be featured at “The Big Read” Film Festival on Sept. 23 at Patterson 101 on the Troy University campus with Dr. Maryjo Cochran as the discussion leader. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more


May 24, 2021 0

Fincantieri Gets USD 89.6 Million USCG Contract

first_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: USCG Equipment & technology On the occasion of the Cruise Shipping Miami Conference and Exhibition, the most important event of the year, Fincantieri announced it has been awarded a contract from the U.S. Coast Guard for the construction of 40 boats, scheduled for delivery in the second quarter of 2013.With an approximate value of $89,600,000, the new boats are part of a multi-year, U.S. Coast Guard contract for the construction and delivery of up to 250 Response Boats – Medium (RB-Ms) at a total contract value of up to $600 million. This new order brings the total number of boats under contract to 166.Marinette Marine Corporation, a U.S. Fincantieri company, will act as prime contractor and program manager and will build 50% of the boats at its ACE Marine facility in Green Bay, Wisconsin. MMC’s Teaming Partner, Kvichak Marine Industries of Seattle, will build the other 50% of the boats at its Kent, Washington facility.Commenting the new order Giuseppe Bono, CEO of Fincantieri said: “We are very proud we can keep on serving the U.S. Coast Guard. This order confirms that the acquisition of our shipyards in the United States proved to be a winning strategy and allows our company to provide with top quality vessels not only the Coast Guard but also the U.S. Navy, as well as a wide range of non-government customers.“.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , March 19, 2012; View post tag: Navy View post tag: 89.6 Fincantieri Gets USD 89.6 Million USCG Contract View post tag: Fincantieri View post tag: getscenter_img View post tag: contract Back to overview,Home naval-today Fincantieri Gets USD 89.6 Million USCG Contract March 19, 2012 View post tag: News by topic View post tag: million View post tag: USD Share this articlelast_img read more


May 4, 2021 0

Female Engineers Tour HMS Queen Elizabeth

first_img Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today Female Engineers Tour HMS Queen Elizabeth View post tag: Engineers Sixteen of the country’s best and brightest young female engineers were filled with inspiration after visiting Britain’s biggest warship HMS Queen Elizabeth. July 9, 2014 View post tag: HMS Queen Elizabeth View post tag: europe Share this article View post tag: UK Female Engineers Tour HMS Queen Elizabeth View post tag: Tour View post tag: biggest warship View post tag: Navy View post tag: News by topic The undergraduates from the Brunel University branch of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) were given a personal tour of the 65,000-tonne new carrier – unveiled to the world last week as Her Majesty the Queen officially named the ship in Rosyth.The London-based students were invited to tour the state-of-the-art warship as part of an initiative to promote the role of women in engineering in general and provide the visitors with an insight into the role of female engineers in building the carrier with the Aircraft Carrier Alliance and running the ship as a Royal Navy engineer officer.Babcock engineers Jen McGinley and Laura Porter did the former, while from the ship’s company Petty Officer (Weapon Engineer) Steph Simpson and Chief Petty Officer (Marine Engineer) Lyndsay Oldridge shared their experiences.PO Simpson offered an insight into the Queen Elizabeth’s innovative automated weapons-handling system and communications network and CPO Oldridge provided her expertise on the marine engineering side of the ship – the power and distribution system and its component elements, and the ship’s systems, from chilled and fresh water to sewage treatment plants and fuel management.The highlight for the students was a comprehensive tour of the carrier from the bowels to the bridge.They were shown one of the smaller diesel engines – far larger than any of them had ever experienced before.When coupled with the Queen Elizabeth’s other power plants, the ship generates approximately 110 Megawatts of power.All the visitors – studying across the engineering spectrum: mechanical, social, civil, biomedical and aerospace – were struck by the scale of the Queen Elizabeth project (each of the two ships comprises in excess of 17 million parts).[mappress]Press Release, July 09, 2014; Image: UK Navy View post tag: Female View post tag: Navallast_img read more


May 4, 2021 0

Commentary: Record-Breaking Numbers Of Women, But It’s Not Enough

first_imgCommentary: Record-Breaking Numbers Of Women, But It’s Not EnoughNovember 20, 2018 By Mary Beth SchneiderTheStatehouseFile.comThe new Indiana General Assembly was sworn in Tuesday, with an important milestone reached.More women now represent Indiana in the state legislature than ever before. In all, 35 women now serve in the House and Senate, beating the past record of 33 women set in 1995.Yes, it took Indiana more than two decades just to add two additional women to its 150 members. Hardly a reason to pop the champagne. Women make up about 51 percent of the population of Indiana, but only 23 percent of the General Assembly, even with this year’s historic gains. That’s less than the national average of just over 25 percent in 2018, a number that’s sure to be higher due to the so-called “pink wave” in this November’s elections.Except, that is, for the House Democratic caucus. Only two of the 10 Senate Democrats are women and only seven of the 40 Senate Republicans. Among the 67 House Republicans, 9 are women, for a paltry 13 percent.But women are actually a majority of the House Democratic caucus, holding 17 of that side’s 33 seats.Tuesday, as lawmakers took their seats in the House of Representatives, the differences were striking. On the Republican side, every face was white. The first three rows? All men. But the Democrat side looked a lot more like a portrait of the state, with 15 black lawmakers, one Hispanic and the state’s first Asian-American in the legislature.Looking down the rows of lawmakers, some new faces joining long-time members, the change that this year’s election brought was clear. In one row on the Democratic side, there were six women and one black man. Take it from someone who started covering the legislature back in 1990: That’s an unprecedented sight.Does it matter? Women and minorities — including the first openly gay senator — now have more seats at the table. But do they have a voice, especially considering that Republicans, who hold supermajorities in both chambers, have no minorities at all among their members and only 16 women among their 107 members?And women have yet to break into the top leadership roles, though they fill a variety of “assistant” this and “deputy” that, plus committee chairmanships. All four caucus leaders are white men.“It’s still a man’s world,” said Rep. Vanessa Summers, a black Democrat from Indianapolis who has served since 1991. “Hopefully that will change just by listening to some of the things we have to say and (realizing) how important it is to hear another side.”Rep. Maria Candelaria Reardon, a Hispanic Democrat from Munster, said “the chamber should reflect the population. It gives people a different perspective. People only know what they know, and when they hear another perspective then they can give it weight and consideration.She and Sen. Vaneta Becker, a Republican from Evansville, were both optimistic he legislative agenda will reflect many of the concerns of women, from better funding for the Department of Child Services to raising teacher pay.Rep. Sheila Klinker, D-West Lafayette, has been in the legislature longer than any other woman currently serving, first winning the election in 1982. Then, she was one of only 14 women serving in the House and Senate.She now sits in that nearly all-female row. And she expects the numbers to grow, citing women elected to city and county offices who may later move up to the Statehouse.That, though, is the same story I’ve heard since the 1980s. It’s the year of the woman! The glass ceiling has a million cracks! A pink wave! And then — tiny incremental change.Maybe this year will be different. After all, it just isn’t in Indiana that more women than ever are holding elected office. At least 122 women will serve in the next Congress, a record-breaking high of 24 percent that leaves Congress far from reflecting the nation’s demographics. There, as in Indiana, the gains are largely on the Democratic side.Parity, though, shouldn’t be a partisan issue. Republicans cannot grow if they are the party of old white men. America and Indiana are better with a leadership that truly represents the people.The gains of 2018 have to be a start, not the finish.FOOTNOTE: Mary Beth Schneider is an editor with TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.This article was posted by the Ciyi-County Observer without editing.Print Friendly, PDF & EmailFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more


May 3, 2021 0